When a Caregiver needs the Care

Our caregiver expert, Patrick Leer, has been absent for a while from his writings.  Those of you who read his blog, at http://caregivinglyyours.blogspot.com and his writings here at MultipleSclerosis.net, know he has chronicled his experiences as the caregiver for his wife, Patti, and their years of living with MS as the third partner in all they do.

Patrick was diagnosed with Stage IV Lung Cancer – he is one of those people who never smoked but still got this insidious form of cancer – and has been open about his fight on that battle as well as continuing to look after Patti’s emotional and caretaking needs.  He recently had a serious health scare and contracted pneumonia.  He was hospitalized, and the pneumonia zapped his strength so much that he was discharged to a nursing care facility instead of home.  Fortunately, this is the same facility where his beloved wife, Patti, has lived for many years.

Their daughter, Megan, is able to visit both of her parents at one place, and has shared updates about Patrick’s health and his desire to get back to being the caregiver rather than the one needing the care.  Megan has been sharing messages with Patrick, and those notes help to pass the time.  She has recently written that she would like more notes to share with her father, and if you have any words of encouragement to offer, we would sure like to pass those on.

Each of us here with MS holds the thought somewhere that if we don’t already rely on one, some day we might need a caregiver like Patrick, to oversee our needs. He has exemplified the ‘for better or worse’ part of their vows and has openly shared their 23 years of living with Multiple Sclerosis at

http://caregivinglyyours.blogspot.com/

Any and all words of appreciation for his sharing the MS and Cancer journey, as well as words of encouragement will be passed on to Patrick.  I hope you will join me in expressing my appreciation, respect and well wishes.

Wishing you well,

Laura

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The MultipleSclerosis.net team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

View Comments (2)

Poll