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Doctors Who Spread Misinformation…

“I’m confused, I’ve seen 3 or 4 neurologists, including VA Neurologists and they all keep saying that MS is a women’s disease. The VA Neurologists did MRIs of my lower back, neck and brain, all without Contrast … the only one with Contrast they did was the brain, they tried to tell me Contrast doesn’t really show anything … I had a white spot and they said that those are normal, everyone has those and that I don’t have MS. I can’t seem to get any help, and it’s so frustrating. Any suggestions?”

This is a comment I got on an old blog post of mine about how multiple sclerosis is diagnosed. Most people just ask me if I think they have MS but all I can say is “they need to see a neurologist and get tested” because I am not a doctor. Every once in a while, I hear something like this that just makes me mad but this one really irritated me because every bit of information they gave this guy was unbelievably wrong…

Now before I go on, I just want to say, this is not me trying to just bash doctors and be all negative, this is simply me trying to find an explanation for something I observe all the time.

So I replied to this comment and told him that these “doctors” he saw either did not actually go to medical school or are flat out lying to him. But really I think it has to do with the reason I dislike many (not all) doctors; “I am a doctor, a NEUROLOGIST, I am a step down from God so how dare you question me. Whatever I tell you is pure truth.” That mentality is called a major ego. Sound like someone you have seen? I can’t stand people with an ego and as many of you know, a lot of doctors are 90% ego!

I can’t say ALL doctors because I assume it’s like how most sociopaths get into business or politics; if they don’t care about people it makes it really easy to do the ugly stuff that makes them a success but not all businessmen or politicians are sociopaths. So I think people with a huge ego are attracted to things like becoming a doctor of some sort because of the power it gives them over others. Of course, this is PURE speculation on my part but I just can’t find any other explanation. Also, again, I am not overgeneralizing doctors here; there are obviously many great doctors out there who care dearly about their patients. I am just talking about the doctors who clearly do not.

What really grinds my gears is that as a patient with MS (or any other chronic disease) we typically want to educate ourselves on this disease because we will probably live the rest of our lives with it but some of these doctors criticize us for knowing a thing or two about our own chronic disease that we wake up with and go to sleep with everyday. “Where did you hear that? WIKIPEDIA?” “Actually, no, medical textbooks, same as you…” But what does it matter where we got the information so long as it is correct? Well, it doesn’t, but this is their ego talking; I imagine they are insecure about the fact that you are decreasing the gap between how much you know and much they know. If you are not insecure about your knowledge as a doctor you will encourage your patients to educate themselves just as my neurologist does.

But the number one rule that many doctors are taught (my mother is an occupational therapist and this is what she was told in school) is do not admit that you don’t know something to a patient. So you ask a question, they don’t know the answer, but rather than admitting that they tell you something completely wrong because they know that they are a doctor and you will more than likely believe anything they say. Because of this, we have people thinking multiple sclerosis does not affect men and brain lesions are completely normal because “everyone has them”… When I was trying to raise money for a stem cell procedure (which I did not end up doing) I was told by many people that I am just trying to scam them out of their money because men do not get MS, especially at my age. Total misinformation. And this does not happen with just MS; I have a friend with Dandy Walker Syndrome (a brain malformation involving the cerebellum and fluid filled spaces around it) going through the same kind of things with her doctors. I can’t stand doctors who treat people like idiots; it may be easier to treat people who are uninformed but it’s wrong…

I wouldn’t cross the street with my eyes closed just because someone tells me there are no cars so why should I believe everything you tell me without asking “why”.

What sort of obvious lies have you been told by a doctor?

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Comments

  • Catgirl66
    3 years ago

    Matt, you aren’t bashing DOCTORS, you are bashing incompetent a$$#@!3$ who happen to hold medical degrees. The ones you like & who offer valuable information are the REAL doctors. The others, well, you’ve already read my opinion of them.

  • Matt Allen G author
    3 years ago

    Well, I don’t DISagree haha

  • David23
    3 years ago

    I have foud that that majority of doctors that I have seen are quacks. They just want to get out thier prescription pads and write a few worthless meds. Your cholesteral is high and you need BP med or depression med, even daily asprin all while making your health worse.The doctors are only worried about their pockets NOT YOU.

  • Matt Allen G author
    3 years ago

    A lot of the doctors I have seen were/are the same; just drug pushers in a lab coat haha…

  • LewinNEFL
    3 years ago

    David23, Yeah doctors who went to medical school pretty much before the ’90’s are stuck in the 18th Century medicine mind set for MS. They weren’t taught much about it. If they didn’t specialize in MS patients then they may encounter only a few patients a year and never research treatmnets or symptoms. Yes, more women have MS but basically any one can get it. Why? No One knows. How? No one knows. All of us are different. As are doctors. Some will suggest CoQ10 in great volume or an overdose of Vitamins, which in itself can exacerbate or imitate
    some MS symptoms. Up to date MS docs will probably prescribe at least one of the widely accepted MS treatment drugs that have been market beginning in the mid 1990’s to date. We are all different so I can’t recommend which is the best. I’ve been on Avonex pretty much since it was made available. Betaseron before that. all have some side effects and apparently there is value in each for treating MS. That’s up to you and your prescribing doctor.
    As for the “quack” docs out there. The more office visits you have with them the more they make. See below comments by me. Repeat office visits is the basis for their practices financial survival.

  • LewinNEFL
    3 years ago

    Dear Allen, The VA has 13 MS specialty clinics nationwide. Rather than see the staff neurologists at the hospitals you need to get an appointment with the spinal cord injury clinic at the hospital. This is where the MS and ALS doctors live. No one in the hospital will refer you here unless you get on your horse and take matters in your own hands. The VA staff doctors in neurology may not even know the hospital has a spinal cord injury clinic. Those guys are dealing with back injuries and auto accident patients forgetting MS 101 classes in med school.
    If your VA hospital doesn’t have a spinal cord injury clinic then you have to dig in and insist on referrals to one. Also you have a Congressionally created representative organization called the Paralyzed Veteran’s of America. You need to find their office at your VA hospital and fall into formation with them. For no fee from you they will represent you in the VA medical system. They will file claims and advise you on VA treatments and testing. They understand MS, the testing and diagnosing procedures as well as what side effects MS causes patients. They also help with all spinal cord injury patients that are going through the VA classification system. THE PVA will file your VA claim paperwork, Represent you in VA disability rating hearings as well as file appeals. They understand the side effects of MS as well as it’s stages of progression. They know how to motivate the VA system to integrate you into it’s MS treatment program as well as rating levels/compensation levels. This costs you nothing and removes the worry about what do I need to do next in the VA system. Plus they advise you about what compensations you may be due from the VA.
    My first MS experience was undiagnosed in December 1974 while having been on active duty for less than 2 months. It was years before MS actual brought me down physically and to the point of looking for help and diagnosis. At first I worked outside the VA “doing it Myself”. That accumulated some civilian medical records and my civilian doctor is the one who focused me back to the VA system. I thank God for that everyday. Carrying my civilian records into the VA through the PVA I was soon rated and eligible for treatment. The PVA monitored my status and recommended reevaluation periodically as parts of my body lost function due to MS progression. The PVA was created by Congress after WW2 to help returning soldiers that were paralyzed in combat and from MS or ALS.

  • Prairiekim
    3 years ago

    My first neurologist asked how old my grandparents were when they died. After telling him their ages he told me MS would decrease my life span by 25%. Therefore I would die at about 64. I didn’t believe him but with my 64th birthday in a month, that comment sticks in the back of my mind.

  • LewinNEFL
    3 years ago

    Horse apples. Many docs went to medschool in the ’70’s and have never bothered to read up on MS since they left Med school. My diagnosing neurologists, whom I found through referral from the ophthalmologist who diagnosed my optic neuritis, told me for six years that there is no pain involved in MS because the nerves do not work. I found and MS specialist at the regional Mayo Clinic near here that had me in pain treatment a mere 24 hours after I met her. The pain subsided for the first time in six years.

    Most docs that hang up a shingle for their own personal business are in to referrals. Referrals are the life blood of a successful medical practice. I would on speculate that docs might get referral fees from the docs referred to by them. But as far as referral medical tests there is a money generating game they play. After the first visit you are told you need a medical test from a 3rd party. You then pay for an office visit. Now you go to the referral and they get paid for the tests they perform but will not discuss the results and you are sent back to the first doc. Then you pay for a second office visit and receive confusing results to be told to take test 2. You pay for office visit 2 and go to the test. Then go back yo the original doc for office visit 3. This process will drag on for multiple test and many return office visits. When the original doctor runs out of test referral then you may or may not get a diagnosis. In the meantime you’ve now been drug out for months or years scared and in pain dealing with strange symptoms pretty much on your own. The primary referring doctor has been paid much overhead dollars by using you and your insurance plus your deductibles to cover his office overhead and the BMW payments.
    A specialty clinic usually operates differently. After the first office visit it may be possible to take the same tests that the original private practice doc took months or years to do and complete the same tests the same day oy the next day then return at the end of the first or second day to the clinic neurologist for a diagnosis as well as a treatment plan beginning on the second or third day since you first entered the clinic. All for much less costs to you and your insurance company. It is better for you too as someone is actually directing you into a treatment plan right away. You will find however, that some insurance companies discourage specialty clinics in favor of the original example of office visit, test return office visit, test, return visit ad nauseaun. I can’t explain this beyond perhaps since a clinic provodes the tests in house that they charge higher fees to support the overall organization and insurers may believe they test you in house for many things for profit only. The insurers are more interested in their profits than you being diagnosed and treated. Insurance industry policies, medical practice operations training and government controls impose rules that actually do not favor your diagnosis in a shorter time frame.

  • David23
    3 years ago

    I bet keep your head up and forget what your doctor said,stress sucks.

  • Matt Allen G author
    3 years ago

    Just because it CAN cause early death doesn’t mean it WILL. And even so, it’s not like people just drop dead at some age, it’s more so that as some people get older their symptoms get worse and they are more likely to fall you know? It’s nothing to worry about that we don’t ALL already worry about; don’t fall and hit your head on the curb you know?

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