Skip to Accessibility Tools Skip to Content Skip to Footer
A person uses their hands to fit a puzzle piece into the corresponding space.

Getting In What I Can, While I Can

Had I’d known or even had a clue that my life’s trajectory would lead me to live with a chronic, degenerative disease, some of the choices I made would have undoubtedly been different. I would’ve definitely lived by the ‘more’ creed.

I want more

For instance, I would’ve gone on more nice, leisurely walks or even ran more. I would have taken opportunities to travel more, gone to the beach more, visited family/friends more and cooked at home more as opposed to ordering out. I would’ve danced another dance, drove another mile, played that game of volleyball at the family reunion, and a host of other activities that I can either no longer do or have to exert quite a bit of thought, effort, and energy to complete. That is why, at this juncture in my life, it’s extremely important to me to get in all I can while I can…before I can’t.

A good day

I have a car with hand controls that I drive if I’m having a ‘good’ day. It’s maybe only to drive to church, take my daughter to the store or to get a snack and to be able to take Bailee, our puppy, with us. The outings are rare, but I cherish these times because they could conceivably be gone all too soon. Nowadays, it’s increasingly tiresome and difficult to walk so I essentially utilize my wheelchair. But, I keep my walker near and for the short distances that I can walk, I do – with an understanding that it may not be a ‘luxury’ I’m afforded at some point in the future.

Enjoying the time

I love creative writing. My hands aren’t always cooperative so I have to sometimes use the voice to text feature. However, I refuse to solely use it because I want to utilize my hands, no matter how limited the function, in case a time comes when I cannot.

Do it now!

My point is, I want to – actually have to – do everything I can do now because once it’s gone, like so much is already, it’s just that – gone. I recall hearing on one of my favorite shows, Grey’s Anatomy, “cause you never think that the last time is the last time. You think there will be more. You think you have forever but you don’t.” Though this sentiment can be applied to other circumstances, I can attribute it to my situation as it relates to the limitations that a degenerative disease like MS spawns. Who knew that the last dance on my feet would be the last dance on my feet? Why wouldn’t I have thought there’d be more chances to do the things I miss now that I so casually I put off? I was just living my life and taking for granted ‘it’ wouldn’t happen to me. Yet, MS did. It happened.

Life’s lesson

If there was a lesson to be learned here, I’d say it’d be to do all you can while you can because one never knows… As for me, I don’t live in regret because I’m too busy these days getting in all I can while I can.

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The MultipleSclerosis.net team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

  • Dianne Scott author
    9 months ago

    Exactly the same here, @clumsymumsy2 !
    Butttt… I have this…
    https://multiplesclerosis.net/stories/dancing/
    Thanks for reading!
    Best,
    Dianne ♡

  • ClumsyMumsy2
    9 months ago

    I definitely miss dancing. I wasn’t a professional or especially good at it, but I LOVED it.

  • Dianne Scott author
    9 months ago

    Hi JimmyMac ( @jimmymac )

    Absolutely, I totally agree with your sentiments – especially relative to how we should all do what we can while we can.

    The articles that I write, may seem to apply to MS/Chronic illnesses though my intent is for them to also be able to encompass or be applicable and encouragement for anyone’s situation.

    Your comment demonstrates that I may have accomplished just that so I not only thank you for reading, but definitely for taking the time to leave your opinion!

    Take care,
    Dianne ♡

  • Carol
    9 months ago

    Dianne,

    Thanks for the great article. I know exactly about if I had known I was going to be like this I would have definitely had too many times of “more.”

  • Dianne Scott author
    9 months ago

    @capitolcarol ,
    Hi there! So we’re on the same page..☺
    Thanks for reading!
    Warmly,
    Dianne ♡

  • potter
    9 months ago

    I feel exactly the same as you. When I was first diagnosed I thought I should have done more. So I decided to do as much as I can now. I started working in my pottery studio more. I have done some huge mural, fountains and fireplace projects in the last 10 years since I was diagnosed. I finished my last two mural projects last October. The big murals are getting to difficult for me so I am getting ready to open a internet business to sell hand coiled pottery. First thing I lost was my ability to throw to MS. Recently a potter friend of mine found a good price on a electric wheel for me. I sold my kickwheel and have been trying to retrain some neuron pathways. I am able to make small bowls and cups but plan to keep upping my abilities. We are taking long vacations every year, leaving for Yellowstone in a couple of days. I may not be able to hike but I can enjoy the scenery. I will be 66 in October and plan to do more as long as possible. Even bought some new equipment for my studio. Potter

  • Dianne Scott author
    9 months ago

    Hey Potter ( @f5hwo4 )!
    Wow.. You’re doing great! I’d love the opportunity to see some of your creations and have the link to your internet business when or if it’s ready. Have a wonderful vacation – and not just Yellowstone, but I hope you thoroughly enjoy ALL of them! I don’t get to travel so I will live vicariously through you☺
    Thanks for reading and sharing, my friend!
    Take care,
    Dianne ♡

  • JimmyMac
    9 months ago

    I’m not so sure life is now get what I can while I can because this applies to all humans. I think a part of introspection is realizing your unable to do some things that you could only a short time ago but I wonder if I would’ve had regrets without a MS diagnosis. I’m definitely different than I was 20 yrs ago but I’m not sure that makes me someone that stands out. True, I’ve had to adjust to some really horrible things but I don’t regret, that’s a waste of time, the things I didn’t do when I was younger. I get the article but thought I’d throw my 2 cents in

  • Dianne Scott author
    9 months ago

    Hi JimmyMac ( @jimmymac )

    Absolutely, I totally agree with your sentiments – especially relative to how we should all do what we can while we can.

    The articles that I write, may seem to apply to MS/Chronic illnesses though my intent is for them to also be able to encompass or be applicable and encouragement for anyone’s situation.

    Your comment demonstrates that I may have accomplished just that so I not only thank you for reading, but definitely for taking the time to leave your opinion!

    Take care,
    Dianne ♡

  • Poll