Life Changes with MS

Life Changes with MS

I quietly made a big change in September, and on the advice of my neurologist and with the support of my family, I stopped working full-time. I’ve done this so quietly, even most of my fellow-MS experts here as MultipleSclerosis.net don’t yet know this news. Well of course, if they read my articles then they are hearing it here, too.

At first, I wanted to see how being out of the workforce and being on short-term disability might feel and if it was the right thing to do. Within a month, I knew it was beneficial to my well-being to not feel the push and pull of being at work each day. The ever present fatigue improved, and my mood was definitely better.

To understand why I delayed this for so long you need to know I really like my place of employment; I have worked for a private University, surrounded by smart faculty, engaging students and those of us in the support staff. I have worked there for over 25 years. It is a great work environment, and I was even fortunate to only work full-time 10 months of the year, with a two month (unpaid) break in the summer.

There are still many people in all corners of my life wondering why I left work when I look so good, and continue to do many MS advocacy projects as well as enjoy leisure travel. If you have multiple sclerosis you already understand. For anyone else left wondering, let me share the process of my 7 hour work day (8 hours if you count the one hour unpaid lunch).

The alarm rings at 5:30, and I would roll out of bed. I toss back my pills …. and then I wait. An hour or so later, my body is finally awake and the signals of my errant central nervous system are slowly connecting from my brain to my legs. I take a shower in as cool of water as possible so I don’t overheat my body. Unfortunately on the days I also shampoo my hair, that means I have to use the blow dryer and  have again increased my core temperature. It doesn’t take much of a change in temperature to kick off L’hermitte’s, a form of heat sensitivity that degrades the body’s signals. My pace to dress and make the finishing touches to get out the door slow down while my body regulates my temperature and I try to cool down.

Eventually, I can comfortably leave the house and drive to work. The 20 minute sit in the car is just enough to allow my body to forget again that my legs should move when my brain commands, and I slowly make my way out of the driver’s seat and plant my feet on the parking lot pavement. There is a slight incline on the walk to the building, but on some days it might as well be Mt. Everest, because my legs feel the climb. It takes me at least three times longer to walk into the building than the others around me who are rushing to class and work.

Three hours from when I first wake, I am finally at my desk, but not really because just sitting for the next 8 hours isn’t possible. Taking care of 60 faculty members in the largest academic office on campus is no easy task, even though there are two of us.  Multi-tasking is the norm of expectations, but as my MS has progressed, I found this exhausting. I am aware how fortunate I was to have a ‘desk job’ and wasn’t working in a place that required standing for much of my work shift, such as teachers, line workers or cashiers. The clock finally reaches the end of the work day, and I face the prospect of climbing down Mt. Everest to my car. Ok, I exaggerate about the steepness of this walk but you get the picture.

If traffic flows well, I arrive home at 5 PM, almost 12 hours after my day started with the early morning alarm ringing. It’s recommended we get 7-8 hours of sleep per night, and if I follow that suggestion, I have a few short hours remaining in the day to do other things. I would spend time working on my laptop, writing and researching MS information. But there’s no physical energy left – the fatigue of moving through the day has pretty much taken all I have. If this is just Monday, I have four more days to pile on this routine. By Friday, I found myself spent. Totally done. The weekend days were used to recover for the coming week and the repeat of this routine again and again. I’ve known I was tired, but continued to power through.

The final Friday I worked, I came home early and slept for 15 hours. If I wasn’t smart enough to figure this out, my body was going to make me stop and listen. I saw my neurologist the following week and immediately went on short-term disability and anticipate changing to long-term disability in January.

Fatigue, the kind brought on by MS, is a disabling condition. It’s hard to explain the exhaustion caused by walking when my brain is aware of each step it has to command my legs to make. Having MS makes movement an activity of its own that requires concentration and effort all the time, creating a form of fatigue that can’t really be understood unless you also experience it in full-force.

It’s fortunate for me, yet often still difficult for others to understand, that I can work for hours writing and researching, as long as I don’t need to move my body. Cognitively I’m still together – I just don’t have the moves anymore that are needed to get me through the work day, five days a week, 10 months long, without doing damage to myself. I miss my coworkers, and I especially miss being around the students. But I don’t miss coming home each evening, with nothing much left to give. And I certainly don’t miss the push every weekday morning to get ready to be out the door on time; most days I dress at my own pace and that might not even be until noon.

So many people wonder why when we look so good do we have to make major changes to our lives to accommodate our MS. I hope this explanation of this major change for me helps someone asking that question to better understand. As we are taught from early childhood on, looks aren’t everything.

Be well,

Laura

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The MultipleSclerosis.net team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

View Comments (46)
  • mcc3937
    2 years ago

    Laura, I also have L’hermitte’s sign.

  • mcc3937
    2 years ago

    Laura…you described my day to a tee when I was still working. During my last week of work I was hit with an exacerbation in my MS. I went back and forth to work with severe double vision and pain in my neck. Luckily, there was an eye doctor in my building who I went to see and she immediately referred me to my primary care physician, who was also located in the building. First thought was a stroke. I was taken to ER and then the testing began. I was diagnosed with MS. Over 20 years ago, I had optic neuritis but was not formally diagnosed with MS. Lost vision in one eye blurred vision in the other, color blindness and nerve damage resulted from this. Took 3 mths to recover. Still have recurring bouts of blurred vision and blind spots in my left eye. Needless to say, I lived over 20 years not knowing all the odd symptoms and vision problems, as well as the pain and fatigue where because I had MS. I did not return to work this time as I know now that I cannot keep the pace required.

  • Laura Kolaczkowski author
    2 years ago

    mcc3937, funny how so many of us look back a decade or two and now see that we had signs of MS but just powered through. I’m glad you finally got your diagnosis and i hope it has been better for you. -Laura

  • Jennine
    2 years ago

    Laura,
    I worked as a nurse. I noticed when I was on afternoon shift my fatigue hit almost always at 9:30 pm. When the day came to give up my beloved profession, it was due to cognitive function that made me stop. The ability to conserve and use energy made my quality of life better since I stopped working. Decrease in stress was a plus. I miss what I did, but for my family and I it is a chance to enjoy what few things I enjoy that I still can do!

  • Laura Kolaczkowski author
    2 years ago

    Jennine, I think people in the medical field have particularly tough choices to make because the ability to function affects the patients as well. I’m sure it was a very difficult decision. Thanks for sharing your thoughts. – Laura

  • BethyC
    2 years ago

    Laura-I had tears in my eyes when you said, “but if you have MS you understand.” I am worried about this day coming for me in the future and the thought that I would have to admit to myself with certainty that I just cannot work anymore. Since being diagnosed with MS (just this past August) I have thought that it would be an MS flare that may send me packing one day, but after reading your story it’s a relief to me to hear that it doesn’t have to be a flare to bring you to that decision. The daily exhaustion, the fatigue, the sore muscles, the memory loss, all can be reasons to reach such a difficult decision. Why did I not believe that it is ok to admit that these symptoms were enough to gain back quality of life?! I am so thankful for your perspective. I admire you for listening to your body and for admitting to yourself that it was the right thing for you to do. I don’t know if or when that day will come for me, but I take comfort in your post because it is a reality that those of us with MS must face. I hope I am as strong as you have been when I do need to make that decision. Bless you and thank you for sharing your story.

  • Laura Kolaczkowski author
    2 years ago

    BethyC, It might have been simpler if there had been one catastrophic relapse but fortunately most of us don’t have that happen. The slow decline is hard for even ourselves to notice at first. Understanding what we have to give and how the quality of our lives should factor in somewhere in this important decision is a tough balance to find. Good luck with your future decisions – remember to do what is best for you. -Laura

  • Nobu
    2 years ago

    Laura – your article was great to read. I am at a cross roads as to whether or not to look for a new job or go on disability. I still haven’t made the decision yet butit is good to read about how you are feeling about your change. Thanks for sharing your insights.

    I miss working and the mental challenge. I think I may need to see how else I can use my brain. My personal jury is still out! Thanks for sharing your thoughts. Have a great new chapter.

  • Laura Kolaczkowski author
    2 years ago

    Nobu, those crossroads are a tough spot to be in. Disability is not the easy path and takes a lot of energy to travel through the interviews and paperwork. Whatever decision you make, be sure to find ways that still use your talents. MS advocacy is something that can always use new people … -Laura

  • Nanny to 4
    3 years ago

    Thank you Laura. I’m sure you have heard this many times before – but you just described everything I know so well except the cognitive part in your job. Cognitive issues were a part of my quiting. Diagnosed 10 yrs ago and stopped working within 6 months. I am 69 now. Main thing is YOU reminded me that my fatigue when I may be busy doing the things others do everyday with no problem such as a day where I do grocery shopping, all the running around I can do in 1 day,get home late in the evening, KNOWING I am going to pay for it because I am useless for about the next 3 days and maybe sleep 12 hours one of those days. Start feeling OK again in about a week – is normal for some with MS. My mind thinks I can do what I did when I was 25 yrs. younger. I sometimes need this reminder. I always tell myself afterwards: Think on the positive side, I am very fortunate to be able to ADAPT WITH the life changes MS brings and remember there are millions of others in the world who would give anything to have this life. Always try to look on the POSITIVE side.

  • Laura Kolaczkowski author
    2 years ago

    Nanny to 4, Your positive outlook is something we all need… I hear you about the shopping and the online retailers are now my best friend. I have been postponing a trip to buy new clothes because I just don’t have it in me to go to the store knowing I will be wiped out afterwards. Thanks for sharing , – Laura

  • CoastLover
    3 years ago

    Thank you for your story Laura. I have been through the same thing. Loved my last job working as a hostess in a cheese tasting room on a dairy farm here in Oregon. Was Rx’d in 2001 and did really good until 2014 went down hill fast. I now have to use a cane or walker. Really miss my customers who would come in after Wine Tasting!

  • Laura Kolaczkowski author
    3 years ago

    I’m sorry you had to give up something you really loved – do you have the opportunity to go back as a customer, instead? It might be nice to be on the other side of the counter and just mingle with the folks who have come from wine tasting. (I know, it’s still not the same!). Thanks for sharing your experience. – Laura

  • mscott98
    3 years ago

    Thank you for sharing Laura. I’m a fairly new MS’r so it’s very reassuring to know others are going through the same things I am. I have felt that I’ve just been extremely lazy lately, thinking that if I just tried a little harder, slept a little more, ate better, etc., that things would go back to the way they were BMS. So happy to know I’m not imagining it all!

    Wishing you all the best!

  • Laura Kolaczkowski author
    3 years ago

    My hope for you is you find a way to stop the self-doubt and negative thoughts that this MS stuff is something you can control. Yes, you can take your meds and be proactive, but laziness, diet and sleep have little effect on the bigger picture. We’re along for the ride with this one. Good luck with finding a good spot for you. -Laura

  • AllisonJo
    3 years ago

    Thank you Laura – this may be what I needed to read at this point. I’ve been at the same job for 17 years and I am struggling greatly with whether to “give up” or not. I use “give up” because, before I read your article today – that’s how I felt about leaving. I’ve told myself so many times that the day I walk away, MS wins. But I see that for you, just the opposite is true.

    Our stories are remarkably similar. I am living only to work at this point. By Friday I am so exhausted that my symptoms are insane. I work and I sleep. Weekends are for doing what I can to prepare for Monday…I try to clean and do laundry, but I mostly sleep. I see my family for a few hours at best.

    Thank you for showing me that there is life after “giving up” though I am going to find a new, more positive phrase for the next chapter. I think it’s time to start taking care of myself and spending time with people I truly love.

  • CoastLover
    3 years ago

    Alison please don’t think of it as giving up. You adjust to what ever you do. Stay positive! !

  • Laura Kolaczkowski author
    3 years ago

    We are taught and ingrained with so many self-doubting phrases such as ‘giving up’… wouldn’t it be nice if we could think in positive terms instead, such as ‘reinventing ourselves’ that would allow us to walk away from one thing and move on – instead of thinking of it as surrender. Good luck with these next steps of deciding what’s next for you. -Laura

  • Susan
    3 years ago

    Laura, I’m so very happy that you are taking care of yourself. I too went on disability from a University. I loved my job and the employees and students. At the end, it took forever for me to get ready to go to work too. Then I was exhausted for the rest of the 8:00 to 5:00 day. Before MS (BMS), I could get up at 7:00 and be out the door at 7:30 if need be. At the end that was just a fleeting memory. I did receive my SSD on the first try because our long term disability company at work hired a company to apply for it for you. They called and interviewed me on the phone and took care of everything else and I got it. Couldn’t believe it after horror stories I’ve heard. It has been a blessing for me though. I took up oil painting and I absolutely love it. It is something I can do at home at my own pace and rest as much as I need. As you said, people don’t understand how exhausting bathing, dressing, preparing/eating breakfast and getting to work in the morning can be and that it can take hours. Really puts a dent in your schedule everyday. This results in being exhausted the remainder of the day which usually consists up eating supper and going to sleep. Now you will have more time to devote to your writing and other activities. I love my art and never had the time or energy for it before. I feel God has blessed me in this chapter of my life and hope the same is true for you. Best wishes.

  • Laura Kolaczkowski author
    3 years ago

    Thank you to everyone who responded to this article – it is obviously a difficult change to face and I’m not the only one who has wrestled with this decision. I must say I am feeling healthier and less stressed without the challenges of going to work daily. I have quickly filled more of my time with MS advocacy through the iConquerMS initiative and writing. Good luck to each of us as we negotiate this phase of living with MS. best, Laura

  • Elizabeth
    3 years ago

    Laura, thank you for sharing your story. I admire your commitment to work as you underwent the progression of your disease. I truly can relate to the difficulties of just getting ready. Sounds simple doesn’t it? There was a time when I would wake up at 7 o’clock shower eat breakfast and be out the door by 7:30. Today getting ready on a good day takes an hour and a half. I no longer work outside the home but I found that the stress of being in the workplace just too much to handle. I find working from home a comfortable place to be though I’m constantly searching for new ways to be a contributor to the workforce. Please continue to share your story. You are a true inspiration and I know your experience transitioning to your new lifestyle will benefit all of us. Beth

  • Laura Kolaczkowski author
    3 years ago

    I also used to be able to move from bed to door pretty fast, especially when I overslept. 🙂 I hope you find a place to be a contributor without creating hardships for yourself. Thanks for your kind words.

  • Catgirl66
    3 years ago

    Laura, timely as usual! I, too, am facing the loss of a long term career. In my case, as a nurse. Unfortunately, I won’t miss many of the people I work with. You would think, working in healthcare, the other nurses would have some idea of what MS is, but they don’t seem to have a clue. I would also expect that after working with me for 11 years they might remember that I’m neither stupid nor lazy. Yet still I feel that I am being forced out. My solution is a bit different, but may be helpful to those who still feel that they can work at least part time. I contacted my local DVR. They sent me for a test called a Transferable Skills Analysis to see if any of the skills I’ve used for the past 29 years can be applied to a different kind of work, with or without additional training. I am still awaiting results, but my experience with DVR has been so positive that at long last I feel hope that I might continue to make a difference. I do have hobbies, as one person suggested, jewelry making & soap making, and both are rather lucrative, so even with a VERY part time job
    at a much lower rate of pay
    I will still be able to make it on disability. Bless you & keep up the excellent posts. Personally, with your talent, I can’t see any reason why writing shouldn’t be your hobby. It makes YOU happy & makes the world of MS a little easier to navigate, at least for me. Thanks, Cathy.

  • Laura Kolaczkowski author
    3 years ago

    Cathy, thanks for sharing that you face those same limitations. What is it about health care workers having compassion for their patients but not for each other?? I hope the tests from DVR come up with a great new path for you. -Laura

  • Lisa
    3 years ago

    I, too, worked at a University. I loved my job. My struggles were different from yours, but while deciding I needed to leave was one of the most difficult things I have done, it was absolutely the right thing to do. Thank you for sharing this.

  • Laura Kolaczkowski author
    3 years ago

    Leaving anywhere is difficult but university environments are so special in so many ways it may make it even more so. I’m glad it was the right choice for you (and me!). -Laura

  • Amanda
    3 years ago

    Thank you so much for sharing ur story. I too have started working casual at my job as a CNA, I have been a CNA for 13 years and I have always worked full time. I was just a few months ago diagnosed with MS and decided to work casual at work, 12 hours shifts. I dont feel as stressed anymore or as exhausted as I used to b from when I was working full time and coming home and taking care of my children. I feel I have more of a life and time with my two young boys and family and friends. I am loving life as much as I can. Also I love being a CNA and helping people so I can still casually help people and get out of the house which helps me as much as it helps my patients. I hope everything goes well for u. God Bless. Thank u again for sharing your story. It’s nice to be able to relate to people with MS because not a lot of people understand what we go through.

  • Laura Kolaczkowski author
    3 years ago

    The ‘work when you want’ option is so great for you – I’m glad this worked for you. CNAs provide a valuable service – thank you for finding a way to keep it going while still taking care of your own needs. -Laura

  • Catgirl66
    3 years ago

    CNAs are some of the hardest working people there are & also make a HUGE difference in the lives of their patients– and their nurses. I’m so glad you can still do the job you love, even if only part time.

  • DaSanman
    3 years ago

    I only have one hint of advice for you……. Get a hobbie!!! I’ve been on Dissabilaty for 15-16 years now and take my advice please!!! Find yourself a good hobbie or two, besides learning about M.S., I found myself, as well as others I’ve talked to, find something(s) to do or you will get so board it will actually hurt, (in a mental scence), so my advice is to keep yourself busy somehow, doing something!! I wish I could put this in better words, but I cannot? So good luck to you, and to all the rest of us, myself, my house is always clean and on nicer days I take my walks, that’s just me though, everyone has there own “things”, so again….. Good luck to all of us……we need it!! Lol

  • Laura Kolaczkowski author
    3 years ago

    Just sitting around and doing nothing is not an option for this next phase. I’m deeply involved in patient advocacy (have you joined iConquerMS.org? ) and love to write. My grandchildren and granddogs can take up more of my time, too.

  • Amanda
    3 years ago

    Good advice

  • DJDave
    3 years ago

    Laura, you are so spot on, thank you for sharing your story. It sounds so familiar, I could have written it myself. I am at that point where I wonder every day, how much longer can I trudge on with this constant exhaustion. I too have been working in Higher-Ed for 25+ years, and have found that mid-summer and mid-winter are the worst for MS. It seems the seasonal climate extremes (hot or cold) increase the fatigue 10-fold. Just as you described, I go home every day at 5pm with hardly an ounce of energy left for anything else in life. And then I sleep 12-14 hours every Saturday because the body just can’t go any more. I feel like I haven’t had any resemblance of a normal life in over a decade of MS, and I keep thinking about taking the route of disability myself, even if just part-time at first. The problem is, I’m 52 and have never been unemployed, even for a week, since I joined the military at 17, so taking this step will be so hard to do. I think I could handle not going to work every day, but not so sure about the big change in income, at least from what I know about disability income. All the best to you, keep up the good posts.

  • Laura Kolaczkowski author
    3 years ago

    Unemployed doesn’t mean unneeded and unnecessary. Good luck with facing this tough decision and then finding new ways to be engaged. Thanks for taking the time to share your thoughts. -Laura

  • Di
    3 years ago

    This article is perfect timing for me because for the first time in my life I have faced knowing I just can’ t go to work and work a full week. I feel so exhausted from pain and fatigue that considering part-time if I have to leave the house and drive to work seems to overwhelming like I can tell my body just isn’t going to do it. I was sitting here this morning thinking of how I like to work and I am missing it but I just can’t do it anymore and I found this realization shocking so to read your article was so comforting! I appreciate the way you worded your thoughts and the detailed description you gave because I felt this immediate recognition of someone who would get me and I get trying to explain how bad MS fatigue really is. Thank you for sharing from your heart!

  • Laura Kolaczkowski author
    3 years ago

    Di, thank you for letting me know my words made a difference for you. Finding meaning in what we do doesn’t have to be attached to a job or going to a work and I hope you find other things that give you satisfaction. Good luck with this next phase of decision making – it’s not an easy choice to make. -Laura

  • 200elfn
    3 years ago

    Can totally relate. I was an elementary school teacher when I was diagnosed almost 3 years ago. I only taught for one year after my diagnosis, then made the decision to resign. I was only 36 years old, and had to resign from the only job I’ve ever had. I loved teaching. I loved the kids. I miss it all. But teaching requires UNLIMITED amounts of energy, patience, focus, multitasking, and so much more, and as anyone with MS understands, all of those qualities are LIMITED for us. After being “on” for 6 1/2 – 7 hours straight, I had nothing left to give my two young children, husband, and home. Weekends were spent “recharging” in bed. I made the right decision (for sure,) but now I am having to reevaluate ME with MS. I now find that the more read and write about MS, the more I can start to understand and accept my new life. Thank you for sharing your story with us!

  • Laura Kolaczkowski author
    3 years ago

    Thank you for sharing you experience – I’m sure others can relate to not being able to sustain the energy needed in an elementary classroom. Even when I was ‘healthy’ that was a task that would wear me down if I had been a teacher. I hope this new life is good for you and your family. -Laura

  • Guitar-Grrrl
    3 years ago

    Laura, I completely understand. Last year, I left a 34 year career I absolutely loved, because I just couldn’t do it any more. There are some days now, when I feel relatively strong, where the idea of going into work entices. But then I think about rising at 4:30 am, driving over a 2000 ft mountain, pushing a 300 lb echocardiograph cart all over the hospital, giving coherent report to cardiologists and surgeons, and then the reverse commute to make dinner and crash… Nope. This is one of the best decisions I’ve ever made. Applied for SSDI, was approved first time, by myself, without appeal. Done. I now feel like I have some energy for guitar, painting (my tremor makes interesting effects), gardening… all activities I can put down when I need to rest. Best of luck to you, and I know you’ll still be busy here, and with iConquerMS. Now you’ll have some energy to continue. Big hugs.

  • Laura Kolaczkowski author
    3 years ago

    Thanks for taking the time to comment, Guitar-Grrrl. I hope this decision allows me more time and energy for advocacy work. First time with SSDI and approved? You must have been guided by a special star or force to get that – it’s pretty much unheard of. -Laura

  • DrPatC
    3 years ago

    Laura you have all my heartfelt sympathy. I ‘hear’ you even from across the water. It’s the most awful decision to make. You know it’s the right one in your mind, but your heart tugs at you if you love your job. As you know I was devastated when I had to ‘throw the towel in’ as we say. I was rarely at a desk all day but was having to use a wheelchair around the campus just to get through the day and then spent the rest of my time asleep when I finally left. It was no life at all. It took me 18 months to admit I was better off not working as slowly I noticed the change in fatigue level, mood, etc. I was driven as I was quite close to applying for Professor by then, but a comment from my husband saying “the ones that love you will remember you as Mum and wife, not professor”. So I too took the advice of my MS team and left. It’s now 2 and half years since I left and some days I still sit thinking, maybe I should have done part time work, say 2 days a week. But as soon as I do anything like a full day just pottering around at home I’m exhausted again and I know it was the right decision. But my heart will always be with colleagues and the students as it was a happy time in my life. I still meet up with ex- colleagues for coffee, meals out, etc. And keep up to date with their lives. But academia is not getting any easier to work in and they also reassure me I did the best thing for me. But thank you for this sharing it has made me realise yet again that I’m not alone in these struggles. Hoping you don’t feel you are either.

  • Laura Kolaczkowski author
    3 years ago

    Thanks, DrPat. I didn’t love my job as an administrative assistant, so that makes it easier. But I really did love the environment where I worked and miss the students in particular. You and I both understand sometimes we must stop and listen to the advice of our team and stop trying to figure it all out on our own. I’m so happy you have made peace with your decision. – Laura

  • 3 years ago

    As someone diagnosed in 2000, with symptoms back to high school, I retired in my early 50’s for this reason. It really became too much to continue. The stress goes away along with the responsibility, but the mind still thinks about whether or not it was the right decision. At the time, I could not continue working. As I read these stories from others, it helps. Thank you for sharing this, it really is helpful to find out others are in the same struggles.

  • Laura Kolaczkowski author
    3 years ago

    Thank you for taking the time to comment on your own experiences. I’m like you -I did find the stress left almost immediately after I stopped full time work. I hope it continues to be the right decision for you and for me. -Laura

  • Azjackie
    3 years ago

    Laura,

    I completely understand. I have been retired for two years. It is helpful for me overall.

    I think about all I used to do, work 9-10 hours, drive home, laundry, mow the lawn, maintain a garden, cook dinner, work out on a treadmill 45 minutes (varied speeds and incline), dishes, then pass out asleep to start all over again. Weekends go to my elderly parents and clean. Wow I’m exhausted by the memory.

    Now I adore more relaxation. An easier schedule. Nothing to get done right now.

    Victims of MS learn not to work as hard as we did. We are an example enforcing my belief MS activated by stress.

  • Laura Kolaczkowski author
    3 years ago

    The cycle always reminded me of being a hamster in the wheel, doing the same thing over and over and getting no where. Not having to be showered and dressed by 8 am is my own form of relaxation these days. Thanks for sharing your experiences with us. -Laura

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