Ridiculed at the Doctor’s Office

Recently, I had an appointment with a doctor, a general practitioner, for a routine check-up. A rare, but important, visit that had nothing to do with Multiple Sclerosis. I expected things to go relatively well. I was a tad worried that my blood pressure might be a little high because I have definitely gotten less movement in recent weeks due to the punishingly hot and humid weather we’ve had. What occurred at the appointment, and what would end up having a huge impact on me, had nothing to do with my blood pressure (although, as you read on, I’m sure you’ll understand that it went through the roof during this visit). When I was called to go back, I got up and started shuffling to the door with my cane (I don’t always use my cane, but, with the weather the way it’s been, I needed it badly). As I approached the door and the nurse who called for me, I was greeted with a laugh and a joking remark about me using a cane. This uneducated and thoughtless action by the nurse would wind up haunting me much more than I expected.

Ignorance in the medical community

I get it, I look youngish, I’ve got a big beard, I don’t look the part of someone who needs a mobility device. I don’t look disabled. Normally, I tend to laugh off this kind of thing. I understand that people don’t get it. They don’t know enough about my illness: all the more reason to continue to spread information about it. Somehow, this incident was different though. Maybe because it was someone in the medical field or maybe because I’ve just generally had a tough summer. It was just a tipping point for me. Normally, I’d either joke about it or try to educate the person. This time, I think I muttered something about MS, and I’m not really sure what else. After an extremely long waiting period (while hearing the doctor laughing with someone in the next room), I decided to just up and leave, almost for fear of my anger getting the better of me.

This incident stayed on my mind

I left there and the incident kept nagging at me, in ways that moments like this seldom do. I tend to have a short memory about things. Literally, because of MS, but also figuratively. I have always been good about putting something to the side and moving on (which, I think is kind of necessary when you have MS; you have to be able to keep going and not get too hung up on something). I always think about what they say when a defensive back in football (I played safety back in the day) gets burned on a play: they just have to forget that play and move on, or it’ll eat them up. I tend to think that way about most things in life, I may get really upset by something, but I usually move on pretty quickly. This incident kept eating me up though.

Is this reflective of society as a whole?

As I thought about it more, I realized it was a cumulative effect of years of similar incidents. It also probably didn’t help that it was a healthcare “professional” that treated me this way. I feel like I just sort of snapped inside, like “Really, I get this at a doctor’s office, too? Is society as a whole that uneducated and ignorant? If someone in the medical field can’t be understanding, what hope do we have? What hope do I have?” The whole thing is just crushing to me, someone who spends so much time trying to educate people on an invisible illness. It also make me think about what others, who aren’t even in the medical field, think when they see me. Are they laughing too? Ridiculing me in their minds?

Appearances don’t matter

I’m a bit embarrassed that this has affected me like this. As I said, I’m rarely bothered by incidents like this, but this one has stuck with me. I’m sad to say it might stick with me for some time, too. If there is a point to this ramble, it’s that I’m sure incidents like this happen to a lot of people. Many of whom may not talk about it with anyone; well, I want you to know you can talk about it with me. Hit up the comments if you’ve experienced similar issues. What I really want from all of this though, is for people to share: share this, share other articles about our disease. Share to help increase the knowledge that our disease isn’t picky, it afflicts people of all genders, ages, and races. Share it, because everyone needs to understand that appearances don’t matter and that you never know what someone is going through.

Thanks for reading!

Devin

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Comments

View Comments (45)
  • collena
    2 days ago

    I don’t know Devin, having 20 some odd years on the other side of the counter I would have to askhow old was she? The young work cheap and often land in doctor’s office with very little experience. I always tried to chalk up their insensitive ‘judgy-ness’ to their age and inexperience. We gotta try not to take it personally imho.

  • Lucylucylucy
    18 hours ago

    Agreed. 🙂

  • rmdanielsom
    5 days ago

    Devin,

    I’m so sorry you had to go through that at, of all places a doctor’s office.

    I had a similar experience at my local ER. Besides the PPMS and all of its tone and spasms, I also have Allodynia, a hypersensitivity to ANY stimulation. This means that someone walking past me can at times send me into full body spasms simply from the moving air of their passing. These spasms are often intense enough that you can put my head on one chair and my feet on another and stand on my stomach. It is sometimes referred to as “planking”.

    I am sure you can imagine the over stimulation that happens in an ER.

    I asked the ER nurse if they had any experience working with MS patients and if they knew about Allodynia. They told me no to both.

    When I explained the Allodynia to them and that I was in enough pain from the MS tone that we would only have 1 or 2 tries to get my blood pressure with a manual cuff instead of the automatic ones (they inflate the cuff too far), the nurse walked out of the room leaving the door ajar and told another nurse that she needed to work with the “demanding” patient in the room the first nurse had left.

    “Demanding” was the nicest description that was used about me in that conversation.

    I said nothing to the new nurse or the doctor that followed the nurse about that overheard conversation. We got through the ER visit with no further problems.

    When I got home however, I called the patient relations department and had a long conversation with one of their people about my ER experience.

    They promised me that my concern would be addressed.

    I know it was addressed when I had to make another ER visit about three weeks later for another problem and got the same ER nurse that did not want to work with me the first time. They recognized me from the previous visit and almost walked out a second time. They were also expecting a different behavior from me than the neutral, businesslike attitude I gave them. The behavior had been corrected.

    Like you, I try to educate people around me about the MS and about the Allodynia, if nothing else, for everyone’s safety because of the violence of my spasms.

    Some people have short learning curves (they learn fast) others have long learning curves (slow learners or bigger clubs needed). Most facilities have some kind of patient relations/patient advocacy group. It is their job to educate/enlighten/train staff and hold them accountable to policy, procedures, manners and ethics (the club).

    If this rooming nurse was this rude/thoughtless to you, who else has he/she done this to? Maybe that nurse should be doing another job that doesn’t involve patient contact. The patient relations/advocacy group would be part of the evaluation for this.

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    2 days ago

    Thank you so much rmdanielsom, appreciate you sharing your experience as well. It certainly seems that this type of this is far more common than I suspected!

  • potter
    6 days ago

    I took my mother to a breathing specialist when she was first diagnosed with ALS. The first thing he did was berate her for not exercising enough and told her that is why she wasn’t breathing well. She could no longer talk so I asked him what that had to do with ALS. He asked the nurse to look up what ALS was and he left. My mother sat there for two hours and no one came back. Finally the lights turned off, so I went out and found a nurse. I asked if they had closed for lunch, she said no the doctor had left the country. So I dressed her and took her home. Potter

  • Julie
    5 days ago

    That is a horrible way for a doctor’s office to treat a patient. If nothing else they could show a bit of compassion. There is a nurse at my neuro that comes out to call me back from the waiting room and gives out big sighs as I struggle to stand and then walk slowly to the door. I expect this from the outside world but never at a dr’s office. Shameful!

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    6 days ago

    Thank you potter, ugh, that story is awful 🙁

  • potter
    6 days ago

    I am sorry you had to go through this. I am always irritated at a doctors who say what ever my problem is it has nothing to do with my MS. It usually does but they just brush my information aside. Potter

  • marigoldg
    7 days ago

    Sadly, my experience tells me that your experience is a systemic problem throughout our society.

    I’ve had mall cops stop me because someone in the mall has reported me as being drunk. Given how much I stagger and have balance problems, I certainly *look* drunk, but with a cane, you would think that they would try to not make assumptions.

    I had a family doctor accuse me of faking my need for a walker and then dismiss my explanation that I had difficulty exercising because of significant MS-related mobility issues and that my symptoms actually get worse after exerting myself. When I made it clear that I know my body better than him, he couldn’t get me out of the office fast enough. Needless to say, he was no longer my doctor after that encounter.

    I’ve had people yell at me and even call the police for parking in the disabled parking, despite having a disabled plaquard.

    I’ve suffered dirty looks and not-so-quiet whispers for using the disability carts at stores.

    I’ve been told by restaurant servers that I need to move from a table to a bar stool because they needed more seating. In this instance, the manager apologized profusely when he saw my cane and I started making noises about ADA rules.

    The list goes on and on. Sadly, many people make assumptions about what someone who is disabled is *supposed* to look like.

    I don’t always have the patience to educate others, and, frankly, don’t always feel like it’s my responsibility to do so. I have magnetic signs on my car that say things like “not all disabilities are visible,” “I would happily trade you my disabled parking place, if you will take my MS,” and more. My brother gave me a t-shirt that says, “I don’t look disabled? You don’t look dumb.” I wear it frequently, especially if I’m in a mood.

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    6 days ago

    Thank you marigoldg, I 100% agree that this problem extends far beyond doctor’s offices. People are too conditioned to react only to what they see.

  • BubblinBonnie
    7 days ago

    This has happened to me in the past, though it bothered me, as you said, I’d easily moved on & let it go. However it actually very similarly happened to me recently. I went for an appointment with my doctor when I was stuck in an exam room & sat there until the lights went out, I was in there so long. When I got up to go to the door the lights came back on & I too heard the laughter of my doctor and his nurse, so I sat back down for long enough that the lights went out for a second time. Earlier that month…I called to refill a prescription I was told had been called in but when I called to fill it was told it was never called in, so I called my doctors office as instructed by the pharmacy, while they faxed the doctor. I checked the next day with the pharmacy again, still no script. I was told to call again and the doctor was faxed a 2nd time. Late that evening I received a call from the nurse who told me it’d been called in earlier that month but because I didn’t pick it up-(it wasn’t yet due for refill until the end of the month)-she said it “went away”, it disappeared, was not fillable any longer so it was my own fault. I thought about this, felt oddly doubtful about what I’d just been told and immediately thought I should call the pharmacy to ask as it just didn’t ring true. I called and asked if the prescription had “ever” been called in, explaining to the pharmacist what the nurse had told me. Now I’d been out of the med for 2 days. I guess the pharmacist had had enough of this game because he said to me exactly this, “they are being super unprofessional…the medicine was never called in and if it had been it wouldn’t-go away-it would be available for 6 months.” He then told me the dangers of going without this medicine and the effects it could have. He told me he was going to call them to put an end to this because if they had had it filled I’d have received a call stating my prescription was ready and for how long it would be available for pick up. He asked if I was going to be home so he could call me back. I wasn’t so he told me to stop at the pharmacy before I went home. I got back from an appointment I went to with a friend but was feeling lousy, so asked my friend if they’d go in to get it for me. They went in and the pharmacist told my friend that when he called the doctors office the nurse went off on him about how I’d called too many times about the prescription-(even though they’d told me at my previous appointment that it’d been called in-prompting me to wait until the last minute to call to fill it-to find it was never called in to begin with)-the nurse then proceeded to go on a more than 20 minute rant about me as an individual & patient to this pharmacist who said he just listened, saying little, finally getting a “verbal prescription” for the medication from the nurse. So as I was sitting there feeling distrustful of this office and the staff as a whole by now I too got up and walked out. I was stopped on my way out when I opened the door to leave finding no one in the waiting room and no receptionists left in the building even but heard my doctors voice down the hall asking me where I was going. I felt intentionally put off by them. There had been 3 other patients in the waiting room when they’d taken me back to sit in the dark ultimately. I didn’t want to be there at all and wanted to just stop going to the doctor trying to find a way to justify doing so in my own mind, knowing the likelihood of my being able to actually do this was non-existent. I felt humiliated, I felt less than human to them. I hated having to play nice to the nurse who didn’t know that I knew what she’d said about me to the pharmacy which seemed to me to be a hippa-violation of my rights to privacy. I could barely bring myself to make eye contact with her or answer her questions. The doctor wasn’t any better and I’d never had anything bother me so much that I could hardly sit there and play nice to the two of them. It was mentally painful, I still don’t understand it to say the least as I’ve always gotten along with my doctors but this too was a primary care doctor. I did complain about what happened to the administration only to find out that they’d falsified a record to say that I’d try to fill the prescription early and that it was called in before it actually was. These problems at this particular office had been mounting for the previous 7 months but I never foresaw all of this coming to be. I saw them 3 more times after this all of which were painful appointments for me emotionally. I have now changed doctors. I have a terrific new entire set of providers with much more to offer in a much larger medical practice connected to a teaching hospital. I came to see that my old office was only making business decisions as so many are today & not health care decisions with concern for my overall wellbeing. I don’t expect every visit to always be perfect but I never expect to be twisted up and played games with by any office or system. I’m so glad I did leave when I did because my father was murdered in October and I had to see my old provider twice during this time and the only thing they had to say concerning it was to ask me to tell others-med students, etc how he was killed, by whom and the circumstances-I was never told they were sorry for my loss or asked how I was handling it. Their lack of care or concern for my life and emotional well being over their own desire to be in control has only confirmed what I’d suspected. Though change is hard when you have an illness such as this along with the terrible loss and continued trauma associated with it, served to enforce my feelings of wanting to get away from that provider-actually all providers, and hospital associated with him and his nurse and staff, but I am so glad I went thru with it. I’m sorry you had to go thru this. I went so far as to offer to the administration that I’m sure they are understaffed and overworked, however this does not make their lack of care warranted. The administration concluded their investigation into my complaint with me being wrong as they never looked fully into it and so I am so glad I sought out other resources especially that I’d started so before my fathers murder as I don’t know how much damage could have been done to me physically, emotionally or otherwise had I waited & had to deal with the loss with them alone. My new provider offers many free services I’d been asking for from my previous one to only be told no or simply ignored. I understand that many facilities are understaffed where I live in a rural area but this is never an excuse for lack of or poor treatment of another human being. Thank goodness for sites such as this where we can share our experiences and learn from one another as well as not feel so alone. You’re not alone, neither am I…it’s little to no comfort to know this…it’s frustrating and I wish there was something I could do to change the system. I continue to keep my eyes open for opportunities to do so but there are days and times when we need to not have to be vigilant and have the care we need without having to beg or fight for respect, dignity and life.

  • rmdanielsom
    5 days ago

    Bonnie,

    Wow…You are actually correct. That nurse ranting at the pharmacist IS a HIPAA violation. If you wish to report it, you can do so here: https://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/filing-a-complaint/index.html

    You can also file a complaint with the state you live in regarding how your doctor and his staff has treated you as well.

    And Bonnie, I am sorry you lost your father the way you did. Losing a parent is never easy. Please take care of yourself.

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    6 days ago

    Thanks so much for sharing BubblinBonnie, this is apparently a much more common issue than I expected, I’m glad people can see all the examples like yours!

  • maryoneill
    7 days ago

    I certainly feel your feel your anguish,
    Once someone called the police they swore I was drunk and I had children at home. I was only walking a block and I had to sit down or fall down.

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    6 days ago

    Thank you for sharing maryoneill, very much appreciated! I most definitely can appear drunk if you don’t know me, such a common description for so many of us!

  • Mspbfh2
    7 days ago

    Recently I was out with my sisters. It was getting later in the day, and I was tired. We were going to dinner and my sister was parking the car. There were several disabled spots, and I mentioned to her that we could park there since I had my placket. She replied, “I like to leave those spots for people who are really handicapped, not minor like you”. I use a cane (after falling multiple times, last time break a finger and knocking myself out). This was my SISTER!!! I push myself (I’m in secondary progressive, dx’d about 10 yrs ago), and yes I have been very lucky in my mobility. BUT, BUT I need my cane outside of my home!! Yes, I can go further, BUT I usually will pay for it later. MY SISTER!! It hurts, but I’ve given up trying to get her and my other sister to understand.

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    6 days ago

    Thank you Mspbfh2, I’m sure many of us have gone through experiences exactly like your own. It hurts even more when it’s your own family who don’t understand.

  • MargieF50
    7 days ago

    I have been dealing with symptoms of MS for ~60 years now and trust me, it has improved from when I started this road. But it can improve more and should! I’m sorry when any of us receives less than respectful care or is ridiculed..
    My worst incident happened when I worked at a medical clinic where I also got my healthcare. I made an appointment and told my doctor that I thought I had M.S. He laughed me out of the room!
    I had to quit my job to get medicaid, to afford an MRI … After which, that same doctor (seeing the results) only said in surprise, “You knew!”
    There were plenty of other demeaning and rude moments, but nothing else quite so hurtful!
    Yes, doctors need to be reminded!
    Everyone deserves to be treated with respect!

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    6 days ago

    Thank you MargieF50, so sorry to hear of your experience, but thank you so much for sharing it.

  • BubblinBonnie
    7 days ago

    Right on!

  • mtoddh
    7 days ago

    Ignorant/uncaring people can be the worst kind of humans.

    Methinks that behavior is closely related Narcissism.

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    6 days ago

    Thank you mtoddh, very, very true.

  • LuvMyDog
    7 days ago

    We unfortunately are surrounded by ignorant and rude people on a daily basis, it’s really a shame that you were treated like that, especially in a doctor’s office.
    I’d say that stupid woman was lucky that I wasn’t the one being called in because I am not one to keep quiet when something irritates me!
    Why mumble something about MS? Why didn’t you stop, look her in the eye and say something loudly, put her in her place? I would have. Sometimes that’s the only thing that works with idiots like that.

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    6 days ago

    Thank you LuvMyDog, it rarely happens, but I think I was simply in shock by the behavior!

  • silvrings
    7 days ago

    The worst is when they see you shuffling along with your cane, and then practically run down the hall to the exam room. Like I can keep up with that???

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    6 days ago

    Thank you silvrings! I’ve had that happen more times than I can count! The worst of that may be when they get to the room way ahead of me and then watch me struggle along up the hall.

  • BubblinBonnie
    7 days ago

    When I saw my old provider I spoke of up near the top of this discussion I was taken to get weighed while holding a huge pocket book, can, a bag full of stuff and had my coat & boots on…I had gained 10lbs! Huh imagine that? Nuts, just plain insane to actually have a nurse take you to a scale with everything your carrying and stand behind you watching you with all of this crap in your hands and hear their joy at your weight gain! What a joke…so glad I left there. Had my 1st check up at my new doctors last week and the first thing they did was have me put down everything and remove my boots and coat…whew…off to a good start! I’m no nurse but common sense…what has happened to common sense. The nurse was telling me while being weighed how many providers she works with. Alls I could think was wow, that’s a ton of unlucky people-probably literally a ton! The way she weighs people.

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    6 days ago

    Thank you BubblinBonnie, I think many of us expect staff to be caring and using common sense, but there will always be a subset of people, in any profession, that for them, it’s simply a means to and end.

  • Lucylucylucy
    7 days ago

    This happens to me every time I get weighed at my GP’s office!
    I questioned their methods and was told they take 5 pounds off for clothes,shoes,etc. Well.what if I’m wearing cement underpants and a pair of lead boots??
    They are not much for accurate data.After all.medicine doesn’t require that,does it? Lol!

  • Janus
    2 weeks ago

    Devin,
    I am so sorry you had this experience. I say yes..society is that ignorant as well as some in the med. field. I know I was before my diagnosis. I knew NOTHING about it!
    Last summer my gen. practitioner (the one I had been with for 20 years and diagnosed me with ataxia & suspected m.s.) refused to prescribe me a parking placard because according to his new nurse, he wanted me to “walk & exercise more.” This can be hazardous where I live. Alot of ice & snow. After telling her how utterly offensive this was, she admitted it was because of the way she spinned it to the dr. and apologized.
    Shortly after, I had an appt. with my neuro. who suggested that she prescribe me a placard without me ever having to say anything about it.
    I don’t use it much in the summer, but in the winter it’s a Godsend!
    I very often think that the medical field needs to have updated education on neurological diseases and how they can affect individuals!
    Thank you once again for an enlightening article. I definitely relate!

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    2 weeks ago

    Thanks for sharing Janus! I very much think the medical field should have regular updated education regarding a host of issues, neurological diseases in particular!

  • CptSnarky
    2 weeks ago

    I have had people ask someone I am with why I am using a cane. I am standing or sitting right there, but they ask my husband or child. Somehow the cane has either made me deaf or mute I guess.

  • Lisa
    7 days ago

    Ah yes. This. I have noticed that people not only seem to think I am deaf, but that I won’t understand what they are saying so they talk very slowly and deliberately.

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    2 weeks ago

    Thank you for sharing CptSnarky! I think I’ve been in that exact situation as well. It’s as if a cane makes us not a person, at least it can make us feel that way.

  • mascha
    2 weeks ago

    Yes I’ve sat at the doctors and telling my doctor who knows I have MS about my symptoms. His answer was “ but you look so good”. I continue to see him as I tried another doctor and he had no clue about MS. I’ve had laughs as well when i say I don’t drink. “ oh how do you manage not to drink”
    I’m now so fed up saying, I don’t like it and them looking shocked, that last week I said bluntly “ I have MS. Funny enough no response.

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    2 weeks ago

    Thanks for sharing mascha, that is a response NO MS doctor should ever even consider saying, it shouldn’t even cross their mind!

  • Qcat
    2 weeks ago

    Devin,
    My wife has severe incontintence from her MS which causes odor problems. She asked her PCP if there was some kind of medicated soap that would help. The GP responded, “you should just give up the diapers and self-cath.” My wife was as devastated as you were. When we got back to the car, she said ,” easy for her to say”. Then the tears flowed.
    Thanks for bringing this forward. We should expect and receive more from our medical guardians.

  • rmdanielsom
    5 days ago

    Qcat,

    For odor control, in a perfume bottle, carry some pet stain and odor spray. No perfume to attract unwanted attention and it kills the odor causing bacteria in urine, feces and vomit.

    You can use it on nearly everything-read the instructions though!

  • marigoldg
    7 days ago

    What an absolutely stupid thing for ANY doctor to say to a patient. MS is bad enough, but when it takes away our dignity and a medical provider can’t be sympathetic to it in how they respond to us, they should be in medicine.

    As a side note, your wife should talk to a urologist. I also had severe incontinence problems and they were resolved with Botox injections in my bladder. The results have lasted an entire year and been an absolute life changer for me. 🙂

  • BubblinBonnie
    7 days ago

    I am so sorry for your wife’s pain from this subject. It’s one I myself worry about & feel that I must smell even if I’ve cleaned myself well. As the person below mentions it’s a problem for many. I too use deodorant and powder after bathing to help but can’t help but be self conscious about it as well as nervous about having an accident somewhere which has happened to me with bowel incontinence when the doctor didn’t fill my medication when he’d said he had & I had to wait for days for it…humiliating and dehumanizing. I also carry a package of baby wipes and use them throughout the day. This makes me feel better and feel like I smell better because it’s a way of getting some of it off at least. I’m so sorry your wife had this experience…she’s not alone if it’s of any help at all! I once worked in the ER for a while & I remember a woman coming in who couldn’t control her bowels & how embarrassed she was about it, more for me that I was cleaning her. It never bothered me I felt for her & it was my honor actually to be there of assistance to her in her time of need. I knew at the time that it could be me in this position and has been though not always with someone to clean up who acted as though they were fine with it and it wasn’t a problem. People do need continued training and I think sensitivity training should be a part of it too. If people could put themselves in each others positions in their minds and think of how they’d feel if this was them or their mother or loved one perhaps they’d treat others with more respect and compassion.

  • LuvMyDog
    7 days ago

    Sadly, not much we can do about bladder leakage, incontinence in general except try to get to the bathroom as much as possible, try to empty the bladder and not drink any liquids until we’re within walking distance to a rest room or on our way home.
    A medicated soap isn’t necessary, just good old soap and water in a nice hot bath every day, deodorant and powder.
    Unfortunately, doctors are not gods, they are mere human beings and do make mistakes. They can be rude and in spite of their years of education, incredibly stupid. I’ve experienced a few of those and have let them know exactly what I think of their attitude.

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    2 weeks ago

    Qcat, ugh, that is such an awful, awful response. Unfortunately, these things happen all the time. There is no excuse for it though.

  • Marymary
    2 weeks ago

    Oh Lucy! I miss rockin my 21/2” heels, but still have some lower heels. MS has robbed me of so much; not giving ALL of them up. The make up, the jewelry the hair…if I can’t exercise, I can accessorize! Lol

  • Lucylucylucy
    2 weeks ago

    That woman’s reaction is surprising but then I have read that 1 in 4 people are sociopathic.
    I see people staring at me when I am out using my cane. I assume that they’re trying to figure out what’s wrong with me or if I have a drunk hairdresser,or if I am drunk.-I can do without that assumption.
    When I was first diagnosed,I still wore heels but had to use a cane for support. (Yes,I am nothing if not stubborn) A friend of a friend gave me an attitude for using my cane while wearing heels.I told her I have MS and wanted to rock heels as long as I could. My explanation shut her up but unfortunately didn’t cure her.She simply was an !@#$%^&. Lol
    Another time, a man asked if my cane was part of my outfit.I told him that I was a member of a song and dance duo.
    Then there is the man I hadn’t seen in awhile that knew me before MS and asked why I was using a cane. I told him that I have MS.He seemed embarrassed to have asked that but I liked that he asked a direct question.

  • Lucylucylucy
    2 weeks ago

    @Marymary-I like your attitude! I wear flats nowadays and often walk in them like I’m wearing Gene Simmon’s boots.LOL!

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