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Three versions of Goldilocks stand together, one wearing a 3/4 length sleeved shirt and pants, one wearing a sleeveless dress with a pink swimsuit underneath, and one wearing a cooling vest and straw hat.

Temperature: The MS Goldilocks Zone

I feel like this is such a worn-out topic in the multiple sclerosis (MS) community, especially during this time of the year (summer), but given how common heat intolerance is for the majority of us living with MS? I honestly don’t see it going away any time soon. Our (MSers) environment’s temperature plays such a massive role in our health that there will probably always be something new worth discussing regarding this subject. So, before I move on, I want to make sure that we’re all on the same page.

What does heat mean?

If you’re an “MS veteran”, this should be a no-duh statement; people with MS tend to be really sensitive to heat. Exposure to heat can cause a temporary worsening of neurological symptoms, which is an occurrence referred to as Uhthoff’s phenomena. But the specific detail about this fact that I want to focus on today is a simple (but definitely overlooked) one; what does heat mean? Specifically, what is considered to be hot, and what is just warm?

“Hot” is subjective

Now, I know what some of you are thinking. “Hot is hot, duh.” But is it? Is it that simple? Like most things in life with MS, I would argue that no, not at all. Nothing is that simple. “Hot” actually seems to be subjective, by which I mean, hot to me might merely be warm to you. To others (like a friend of mine who doesn’t have MS) what I consider to be hot might be comfortable or even “cold” from their perspective. I can admit that this kind of seems like a really small detail that doesn’t really appear to matter in the grand scope of treating MS, but I would argue that it actually does matter, because from the individual’s perspective? Well, anyone with a heat intolerance can tell you, it matters a lot to them.

What if heat were objective?

I’ve honestly never looked into what research has to say about this, but I assume that if heat intolerance were objective and not subjective, every single person living with this illness would start to experience an adverse reaction at the same exact temperature. For example, let’s pretend that heat sensitivity in MS is objective. We’ll set the bar at 80 degrees Fahrenheit. That would mean, regardless of whether you enjoy how 80-degree weather feels, the moment the thermometer hits 80, your symptoms would start to flare.

Everyone’s definition of “hot” is different

But this obviously isn’t the case because I know that if I try to go on a short walk in 70-degree weather, I’ll quickly notice that my vision starts to blur and that my feet start to drag across the floor. At the same time, I know people with MS who live in much hotter climates than I do and who are still able to regularly go for walks in 90-degree weather! They really don’t even seem to mind! How is this so? Well, based on that detail alone, I would conclude that there obviously isn’t some universal benchmark for what “hot” is when it comes to MS. Simply put, everyone’s definition of “hot” is different based on what temperatures trigger their symptoms to flare.

The temperature our MS is comfortable in

Sticking to the above example, my body’s limit for heat is in the 70s, but other people’s limit is somehow in the 80s-90s. Maybe they’re just used to hotter temperatures than I am? Wondering this, I’ve tried to slowly acclimate to warmer and warmer environments by slowly adjusting where I set my A/C’s thermostat. While I’ve definitely become less uncomfortable in temperatures that I previously felt were slowly killing me, I’ve still noticed that my symptoms tend to flare up around the same time. Why is this? Why is it that temperatures that other people living with MS would consider to hardly even be “warm” are so detrimental to others like me? What is it that determines what temperature our MS is “comfortable” in?

Finding the goldilocks zone

Really quick, it’s not just the heat either. It, without a doubt, works both ways; some people with MS are really sensitive to the cold, sometimes more so than they are to the heat. I’ve even come across people who have no issues in triple-digit weather but are utterly destroyed in 50-degree weather. At first, I found this to be odd because for me? Sure, cold weather will make my spasticity flare up and cause me to become painfully aware of something called Raynaud’s phenomena (where smaller arteries in extremities constrict excessively in response to exposure to cold) but I would consider “cold weather” to be between 0 and 30 degrees. Despite “a little” Raynaud’s, I still feel much better overall in such a cold environment. I would say that 30-degree weather is my personal “goldilocks” zone. Not too hot, not too cold, but juuust riiight. But to others? Their goldilocks zone might be in the 60s, 70s, or 80s; clearly not at all the same as mine.

No two people with MS are exactly alike

I guess it supports the concept that no two people with MS are exactly alike. Even if they both say that they are sensitive to heat, their definition of what “hot” is might be completely different. Similar, but not the same. Just something to think about the next time you hear someone with MS talking about summer or winter and how they can’t handle what you can.

What would you consider to be your “goldilocks zone” when it comes to temperature? The sweet spot where you don’t feel too hot or too warm; the temperature you would make the entire planet if you could? Share below! I want you to notice the range of different answers that people will probably give.

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The MultipleSclerosis.net team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

  • FoxHaul
    3 months ago

    Certainly, my sweet spot is 65 – 75 degrees and the humidity cannot be too high or I feel like an origami goldfish thrown into a pond. I crumple up and feel “soggy”.

    In the summertime, my ability to sleep well heavily relies on the temperature of the house and when I travel, I’m not always in control of the thermostat.

    Perhaps, the worst part about extreme temperatures in either direction is the muscle spasms I experience in the pelvic floor. If I’m too hot or very cold, it’s over for me. As a childless adult, accidentally wetting myself isn’t the most glamorous of symptoms but that’s life- I suppose??

    That is why I am aching for fall! I feel far safer when I travel when I’m not over packing pairs of pants. Ha-ha. Who’s ready for Autumn like I am?!

  • Matt Allen G author
    3 months ago

    Sorry to hear the weather affects you that way, I myself pretty much always have urgency/frequency issues, so I can only imagine!

  • Azjackie
    3 months ago

    Well I really did something stupid in relation to heat. My stupidity was compounded by EMT and hospital services to where I felt I was living a sci-fi movie.

    I thought I’d get rid of some weeds from my landscaping. A managable for most 7 ft square area.

    The start of my stupidity the weather a crisp 97 degrees. I am extremely heat sensitive over 70 degrees. I immediately felt dizzy but thought it’s a small area, go for it. The second part of my stupidity.

    I accomplished the area but then need to get relief 15 feet away in the house. I am crawling 5 feet and realize I am not going to make it. I am weakening, in pain (my mid thoracic spine 12 years regularly), and boiling.

    Third stupidity I stop fighting. I am laying on my back screaming for help. I am single no children. Finally a person driving by recognizes my durress. He comes to help. I explain I have MS and succumbed to the heat that I need shade and water. He freaks and calls 911.

    At this point I am unable to move and suffering heat exhaustion verge of heat stroke. He stands above me blocking the sun eating an icesicle. I kid you not. I did tell you it was like a sci-fi. I close my eyes and frankly pray for death.

    EMT shows up I tell them it is the heat and my MS. They immediately slap on a collar that had been laying on the ground and poke my finger for a blood sugar level. I am asking for shade and water and I’m answered with a turtleneck hot collar, let’s take her to the hospital, and asked about the cracked open front door to my house appx 12 feet away. I’m beginning to think words are not exploding from my mouth.

    I’m loaded into an ambulance and glucose tested again. I am saying heat exhaustion worsened by MS symptoms on top of no insurance need water and shade.

    We get to ER I am hoping my voice will be heard. Nope. EMT’s tell ER doctor I fell can not move cervical spine may be broken. Unbottoning my pants and tearing off my socks and shoes.

    Then thank god for an inexperienced male nurse. He brings me a small pitcher of ice and water. I am removing the collar turtleneck the blood pressure cuff and guzzling the ice water eating the ice. The ER doc and EMTs who yelled for an x-ray while undressing me had sculked out of the room.

    I feel better able to sit up put my shoes and socks back on with only a new nurse in the room.

    She is talking to me and listening. I tell her about the state pulling my Medicaid due to SSDI income. She understands. I tell her I succumbed to the heat while landscaping compounded by MS. That I explained to the EMTs but they insisted I had fallen. I was crawling. Both my knees ripped in my landscaping jeans. She believed me both my knees scratched and bleeding from crawling. She shared a friend’s Sister has MS. I shared she may be heat sensitive and water and shade are needed for that circumstance. She treated it as her learning had me sign a refusal for treatment and had me wheeled out of the hospital by the godsend male nurse who gave me water and ice.

    My sci-fi was the two inexperienced nurses knew what to do by listening.

    Oh ya I called a friend who took me home giving me more water and ice. My lessen rid weeds in cooler weather, put ice and drinking water on the porch and wear my cell phone.

  • AYW68MS2013
    3 months ago

    My comfort zone is about 65-75 degrees but MOST IMPORTANT for me is the humidity level. Too much humidity throws my brain into a fog and my body to mush. The winters here are generally 30-40 degrees but rainy. I have to sleep with the window air conditioner on in my bedroom set about 62; it keeps the room cool and takes the humidity out. LUCKILY my guy loves and understands me and keeps an extra blanket on his side of the bed.

  • Matt Allen G author
    3 months ago

    Trying to sleep when it’s too warm is impossible. Being ok with “freezing cold” is definitely a prerequisite for whoever I end up with haha.

  • vanna
    3 months ago

    I totally have my Goldilocks temprature in 60’s i’m Most comfortable

  • mollyculelove
    3 months ago

    I live in New Mexico so the desert, and went for a walk with my mom and dog outside and it was summer three months ago so hot like 92 degrees. Early in the morning but nothing I’m not used to. I felt my body climbing the danger zone of that one degree or so jump in temperature and my leg muscles start cramping (I get bad fasciculations) and before I know it I lost my feet and took a super hard fall on the pavement! My dog kept going and now I have an avulsion fracture on my right index finger that’s going to take 7-12 months healing time because it’s a tendon and bone injury. And on my dominant hand so it’s no fun. So I’m careful now to watch the heat and how and when I walk, and if I’m walking with my dog, how I hold my dogs leash and to not wrap it around my fingers or hand. I can’t do hotter than 90-92 to walk. Or colder than 68 I start spasming. Great article. Be careful walking and watch your feet! Hah!

  • pmdpeace
    3 months ago

    Great article Matt. I appreciate the informative responses. I function best at 75 degrees with average barometric pressure, low humidity, no rain or wind, sunshine without it being bright and no full moon… seriously. I can tolerate temps that vary a few degrees either direction of 75, given great conditons. Is there a place on earth that would meet my optimum climate criteria? I have Uhthoff’s Phenomena and Raynaud’s Phenomena. I have a lower than average body temperature and Thermoregulatory Dysfunction. This is one of my greatest challenges with MS.

  • Froggie
    3 months ago

    I agree that heat is our nemesis! I live in Cincinnati and the temps are often similar to where I moved from in North Carolina. My favorite temps tend to be 70 degrees and below. If dressed appropriately, the cold weather doesn’t bother me at all. I loved walking my dog in the crisp fall air when it was 60ish! When it starts to be 80 or so, my spasticity gets worse and my cognition goes out the window. I also love to cook and often wear a cooling vest. I save labor-intensive dishes for the colder months and try to get all my chopping done early in the day when my energy is higher.

  • Matt Allen G author
    3 months ago

    Sounds very similar to me except my spasticity get’s worse in the cold. The heat causes me to experience drop foot among other things.

  • Bkboo
    3 months ago

    Back when first diagnosed. I lived in Cali. I was driving from Hermosa Beach to Sherman Oaks. Once I drove into the valley it was soooo hot and awful. By the time I arrived home and sat down. I was unable to move from the neck down. Needless to say, scared the crap out of me! Once it cooled a bit….I could move. That hasn’t happened since 1994 thank goodness. I live in the south now and its humid. Temps 85 and up, my eyes will blur, thinking and walking gets worse. When I sleep I have to have it COLD 62 degrees, weird…

  • Matt Allen G author
    3 months ago

    I think the recommended sleep temperature is around 60 (National Sleep Foundation I think?), for all people. So it makes sense.

  • Lily
    3 months ago

    Great article. Along with temperature changes, that affect how I’m feeling, I do wonder about barometric pressure changes.
    I find 55 degrees is ideal as I can ride a bike and not get over heated.
    I also find 30 degrees to be comfortable, with proper clothing. I feel no difference between zero and 30 degrees.
    All that being said, if I walk into a warm to hot room, I instantly feel like I’ve lost my mind. I can’t put words together. I will immediately walk out as I know big trouble is ahead if I stay.

  • Matt Allen G author
    3 months ago

    Yep, that is totally me! Although, I now realized I should have mentioned. 0-30 doesn’t seem to feel any different UNLESS you add windchill into the mix. I hate the wind!

  • Anthony H.
    3 months ago

    I think an important point is that it is a raise in core (internal) body temperature that exacerbates MS symptoms. The same external temperature will affect the core body temperature of each person with MS differently, particularly as the MS may affect the ability of the body to maintain a steady temperature.

    I believe the change in core temperature does not have to be large to have an effect – a half a degree Celsius (one degree Fahrenheit) or so. External heat on the skin (eg sunlight, a hot day, a radiator, a hot shower) is transferred by the blood around the body. It only takes a minute or so for blood to make a round trip, so that outside heat can quickly get inside.

  • Matt Allen G author
    3 months ago

    Hmm, that is a really good point I never even thought about. MS can affect your ability to regulate your core temperature so MAYBE that’s why we all experience weather differently? We all regulate temperatures differently. I’ll have to spend some time reading up on that. Makes more sense than anything I have come across so far. Thanks!

  • slaughteringMS
    3 months ago

    Yes! It’s an important lesson in biophysics for us that we live every day the temp/humidity are outside of our comfort zone: the four types of heat transfer are conduction (heat exchange from a surface), convection (heat exchange from a moving fluid–air or water), radiation (the broiling sun on our skin), and evaporation (sweating, the way it’s supposed to work).

    So, it can very well be a snowball effect for us: the temp is too hot, and/or the humidity is too high (so sweating provides no evaporative heat loss), and/or the sun is blazing (so it heats up our skin and peripheral arteries, bringing that warmed blood back to the core), and/or we’re immersed in water that’s too warm. We can feel every step of the downward spiral but do less and less about it.

    But when we reverse the heat transfer trend, e.g., sitting by a cold fan (heat loss by convection/evaporative heat loss with sweating), drinking cold water (cooling the core), getting into the shade (avoiding excessive radiation from the sun), and/or jumping in a cold pool (losing heat to the cooler, fluid that is 800 times denser than air!).

    I hope that you are all doing well! It’s September!!! 🙂

  • Amiracali
    3 months ago

    I will say 50 to 70 is my zone but in my climate area. One thing I didn’t see you mention which greatly affects my sensitivity is humidity! Humidity might be the missing piece to the puzzle. I find when I am visiting areas with low humidity I can handle upwards of the high 90’s! But here where I live with humidity is 50%+ I could never handle that temp. I would say that works conversely with cold as well. As long as humidity is low I can handle colder temps.

  • Matt Allen G author
    3 months ago

    That is one of the first things I thought about years ago BUT humidity doesn’t seem to make a difference to me. 90% humidity sucks, and it’s gross, but it doesn’t seem to affect my MS, just the temperature.

  • AYW68MS2013
    3 months ago

    You’re very lucky. Humidity is a mean, horrible enemy to me.

  • michael honeycutt
    3 months ago

    I’ve been reading these and I have a theory. First my Goldilocks zone is about 50*F-75*F. A lot depends on my activity level and what kind of internal heat I produce. Now for the theory about weather change…
    As humans with iron in our blood, we are walking antennas subject to the electromagnetic realm by which we are surrounded. Weather systems are huge energy producers that can disrupt parts of the same spectrum. I believe that those disruptions are being felt by lil ol’ me and my screwed up electrical system! Then the rapid temperature swings and barometric goodies stack on top of that to get us dancing in the streets so often, like we all do. Y’all know what? You can’t make this crap up!

  • mseverchanging
    3 months ago

    Yes, theory of iron and also barometric pressure are not ruled out. I have both iron genes, that mutated H63d and h634. 17 phlebotomy, and quite rare. No no iron, but need some, did not effect the weather heat. walk dogs 6am, Stay indoors.. So maybe not Iron. Barometric pressure..hmm
    Thermoregulation, yes. Sweat for no reason enough to soak shirt. What do you think Matt?

  • Danielle D
    3 months ago

    I’m fairly new to the MS world – and before I was diagnosed, I feel like I spent half of my life with an intolerance to heat. (tough too, I live in South Florida) Not only do I get foggy and my eye gets blurry, but I CANNOT seem to stop sweating – even when I’ve cooled down a bit. Does this happen to anyone else? (and if it has, any tips? Other than move out of South Florida’s endless summer – which I’m working on!) Thanks!

  • Matt Allen G author
    3 months ago

    If anything? I find myself wondering if I don’t sweat properly! I obviously still do but I’m not sure if I sweat as much as I should? I wish I had tips for you, the best thing I have done is to buy a large “portable A/C” for my bedroom. It also has a dehumidifier setting.

  • 25eapj9
    3 months ago

    Hi there. Thank you for this article. I often feel a little crazy at how sensitive I am to temperature, weather and so much more. My Goldilocks temp is about 73 in the shade and 65 in the sun. I am a So Cal girl and do not do well with humidity. I have extreme damage in the spine and 20 spots on the brain. I have had symptoms of MS for almost 19 years. I like aspects of the cold because I can move better but it hurts something awful being exposed to it if I am not active. Bless all of you on this journey through MS.

  • Shelby Comito moderator
    3 months ago

    Thanks so much for sharing your Goldilocks temp and experience @25eapj9. I used to live in San Diego and agree that SoCal is such a great spot for those looking to escape the humidity and have consistenly mild weather (though it sure can get HOT if you’re anywhere close to the desert). Thanks so much for sharing and please feel free to do so anytime! – Shelby, MultipleSclerosis.net Team Member

  • Toddlius
    3 months ago

    If I’m indoors with A/C, right around 70 is a good temp. But if I’m outside, 75-80 is okay. It’s weird.

    Todd

  • Matt Allen G author
    3 months ago

    Inside the air moves less but outside it’s not “stuck in one place”. I’m kind of the same, more so when I leave my air-conditioned bedr4oom to venture into the significantly hotter house. Even though it is hotter, it doesn’t FEEL too much worse because the house is so open.

  • Shelby Comito moderator
    3 months ago

    Huh, that is strange! Maybe the outdoors provides a little more open exposure, a cool breeze, etc.? Interesting to think about! Thanks so much for sharing. – Shelby, MultipleSclerosis.net Team Member

  • slaughteringMS
    3 months ago

    It’s not weird! It’s heat transfer by convection. And we can use it to our advantage when trying to unload some heat.

  • Magkldy
    3 months ago

    I wish I could find my “sweet spot” I would have to say upper 60’s to maybe 72 is where my symptoms are the best controlled. However, I find this temp leaves me feeling chilled. Sometimes I can put on a sweater and I will survive, but most of the time that raises my core temp just enough to start symptoms flaring. At one time I did better with winter temps and then Fibromyalgia decided to join my MS. Fibro doesn’t treat me well in the cold. So I am stuck with no comfort zone at the moment.

  • Matt Allen G author
    3 months ago

    Aww, I know what you mean, I imagine it’s kind of like having a fever; you feel cold with the chill but your actually overheating. Like you can’t win…

  • Clarissa
    3 months ago

    I totally grok this! Anything above 72F, and I start to lose functionality, sometimes in pretty spectacularly embarrassing ways; anything below 60F runs the risk of triggering my Reynauds. I like to joke that I’m the rare “temperate flower” variation of the “hothouse flower.” I’ve had MS for over 20 years, and that Goldilocks band has gotten narrower and narrower over the years. Give me a cloudy day with a temp of 65-68F, and I am in heaven!

  • Matt Allen G author
    3 months ago

    It doesn’t take much to trigger my Raynaud’s, I sometimes laugh because I used to have a large tropical fish tank. Tropical fish are very sensitive to temperature changes, like me (lol) only a sudden change doesn’t make them feel fatigued, it kills them, so… yeah… not exactly the same but you get it haha

  • Kaos
    3 months ago

    Though temperatures definitely have impact on MS (not sure what my Goldilocks Zone is) one thing that bothers me more is dew points and atmospheric pressure. Literally any “wet” weather, warm or cold, greatly impacts how I feel and if there are drastic changes in the pressure, it sends my MS into a tizzy.

  • Matt Allen G author
    3 months ago

    A lot of people say this. I’m glad it’s not that way for me, I love the rain, I can live without humidity, but yeah

  • monikerr
    3 months ago

    I totally agree with your post Kaos. I feel the same way.

  • Tess
    3 months ago

    65-70 is mine. Very small window.

  • janellew1
    3 months ago

    My comfort zone is generally about 40 to 60. I mean most comfortable. I do adjust to summer heat (which is not that high here in NW Washington) but that usually happens right at the end of the hot weather. Last year, and this year, I suddenly started to sweat — I am not used to that and it feels awful. Although I have figured out it happens usually only in the first few hours after getting out of bed (strange!)

  • potter
    3 months ago

    I only get out and about in the morning, I keep our house at 75 degrees. My husband is also comfortable at that temperature thankfully. If the humidity is low I can even stand higher temps outside. I was diagnosed eleven years ago and my heat intolerance gets a little worse every year. Potter

  • Matt Allen G author
    3 months ago

    You are “lucky” that your husband finds that comfortable. Everyone I live with thinks I’m crazy with my “artic temperatures” of 69-70 degrees haha…

  • slaughteringMS
    3 months ago

    This is the best article I’ve seen on the impaired thermoregulatory function that most of us seem to endure. It’s difficult to articulate it for an audience of people with and without MS. But you’ve done a great job here.

    I concur with the previous comment: humidity makes even 60 deg awful, like wearing full-body pantyhose through which no heat can dissipate. Humidity + 90?? I had a tough lesson last month that has gripped me with anxiety ever since:

    If you’re doing well with your MS, going to the gym, no mobility issues, etc., have you ever wondered HOW it would feel to be completely unable to walk? I found out. At an outdoor concert, with the temp, humidity, and people and their body heat all around, my legs simply quit. I was so weak and just zoned out. My wonderful husband took care of me and summoned for a wheelchair, and took me to the med tent. I was okay after I got some cool air on me for a while. I kept slurring that I did NOT need to go to the hospital. Must have looked like I was ODing or something!

    As for the big question, WHY does this happen to us, the best explanation I’ve seen is that with the myelin worn off some of our axons, the synapses fail to make it to the neuromuscular junctions, and so the muscles we’re intending to use will not contract. As for visual disturbances, cog fog, etc., it’s the same concept: what we intend cannot be completed. Every effort is attenuated. Some of our wiring is fried, like an old lamp that flickers because insulation is wearing off the cord.

    I’m fairly convinced that while we cannot do much to acclimate to heat beyond modest gains that are mostly psychological, we can and absolutely should exercise as much as we can, provided that the environment provides for cool and moving fluids (air or water, convection). The phrase “use it or lose it” applies to us in particular!

    Good luck to everyone out there. Autumn is coming!! Hallelujah!

  • Matt Allen G author
    3 months ago

    Thankyou, glad you liked the post. What I’ve always been particularly interested in is why everyone’s “breaking point” regarding the heat is so different but in one of the comments above a REALLY good point was brought up; people with MS have a hard time regulating their core temperature so I guess, like any other symptom, some people are better at regulating their core temperature than others? Something I have to look into more but man, it makes so much sense! How did I mot think of that before? Oh, and autumn? What’s that? I live in SoCal so we pretty much get summer, medium summer, and brief-winter haha…

  • Lamm
    3 months ago

    Hi Matt & others here, my symptoms seem to show up with the cold, when it drops down to the low 60’s my fingers start to get numb & my legs feel like painful lead pipes. ! I’m glad the heat doesn’t affect me too much because i like swimming & doing other outdoor activities if my body allows it. It really has to be in the 90’s before I’m bothered by the heat. I really think it bothers me because it is actually hot ! Not because of MS. I hope you all have a good day. 😉

  • Karencsk
    3 months ago

    You are so right. I’ve had MS for 39 years now and over the years my comfort zone has gotten smaller. Low 70sfor high and 30s for the low zone. Humidity or wind chill make things far worse. I become immobile when my symptoms flare up. It has been a hot humid summer in the Chicago area so I’ve spent a lot of time indoors with the AC.

  • Matt Allen G author
    3 months ago

    Windchill is the worst!

  • Shelley D.
    3 months ago

    Great article, Matt! This exact topic is, in addition to stress, the biggest determining factor in how I’m going to feel any given day! Humidity is huge for me too. I used to live in NC. I made many mental notes. The most significant (for me), was I’d rather have it 90s & low humidity than 80s (or here in Ohio 70s) & high! I do think that Barometric pressure means even more, but I don’t get how to gage that yet. For me personally, the Goldilocks Zone is 75-85, with humidity less than 50% If I could only afford to live in a place like that…

  • SharonW27
    3 months ago

    Good article. I was diagnosed 16 years ago and until this year, it was the quick change of temperatures in spring and fall that caused flares — not high or cold temperature. This year, for some unknown reason, sunshine on my skin feels like it’s burning and I mind 80 degree weather more when it’s humid out. My perfect day outside is 75 degrees (without a 20-degree drop or rise in one day), no humidity, and overcast or at least clouds providing shade. I’d be interested to hear what others experience.

  • Tigs
    3 months ago

    G’Day Matt !

    Well, I’m going to throw a spanner in the works and suggest that it is the Barometric Pressure and Humidity that we should be blaming!

    I have Thermoregulatory Dysfunction and what I notice is that in the afternoon, around 3 – 4pm the pressure drops and my limbs ‘drop’ with it !!!

    On a day when you wake up and there are heavy storm clouds looming, this also causes Dysfunction.

    On a Hot Humid day, the Pressure is high and again causes your limbs to weaken.

    If you are lucky to have a nice hot, no humid day – you still take shade from the sun, but you are not as weak. Similar to the cold! Get a nice brisk cold with no Humidity and once again you do not feel weak.

    I am no weather expert, but these things are what I do experience myself. Julie Y

  • Matt Allen G author
    3 months ago

    Haha yes, I can’t believe I didn’t address this. That is one of the first things that was suggested to me. Maybe I just don’t know how to measure it right but I have watched the barometric pressure on the daily weather forecast and I have devices around my home that measure the humidity because I was hoping to find some kind of pattern relating to how I feel. Unfortunately, I’ve yet to see any over the years so either it’s just not what I am sensitive to or my methods of measurement are not sensitive enough to capture the small changes that may be affecting me. I have no idea…

  • Poll