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Tremors and Spasms

Tremors and Spasms

The other night, I was trying to fall asleep, but every time I was just about to “cross over” into the dream world, I would be startled awake by my Multiple Sclerosis (MS). This made me realize that I have never really talked too much about the tremors and spasms Multiple Sclerosis (MS) has brought into my life.

Tremors and spasms

First, let’s start with the very thing that got me thinking about all of this. Tremors. Or maybe spasms? Or both? I don’t know, anyway. To be more specific, I am currently talking about tremors and spasms that only seem to occur while I am lying down trying to fall asleep. I very rarely experience any sort of tremors or spasms during the day, but for some reason, when I am in the process of drifting off to sleep, it’s like this symptom, that was previously dormant, wakes up and just wants to party! I’ll be lying in bed and my thoughts will be starting to fade as I slowly slip into the first stage of sleep but then, out of nowhere, I am instantly snapped back into being wide-awake because my shoulder will violently jump forward.

Always just before I start to fall asleep

It’s almost like how a “sleep-start” will wake you up because you randomly feel like you are falling, but instead, I am startled awake by my shoulder spasming. And it’s not subtle; it’s like someone snuck into my room and tried to yank me out of bed by my shoulder! After I am jolted awake, I’ll try to get back into the “falling asleep groove” but… just as I’m about to fall asleep… it happens again!  Once this thing starts, it will just keep happening, and it’s always just before I start to fall asleep. But between these spasms, I will also begin to experience tremors as well. In fact, I have lied there in bed actually watching my shoulder, and it will literally start to visibly tremor for a bit right before a huge spasm hits! Like the rumble of a volcano before it blows!  Eventually, often with the help of medication, I manage to fall asleep. So much for relaxing before bed and not going to sleep while stressed out! I tend to think of it like my MS knows I want to sleep but it doesn’t want me to because it’s, well, just a huge jerk! So it (the fictional character that is my MS) just sits there and waits for me to start to doze off, and then it leans over and shakes my shoulder with a good amount of force in order to keep me awake.

Intention tremors

As far as tremors and spasms when I am awake? As I said, I don’t experience them all that often, but there are a few exceptions. The most common symptom in this category I get while awake is called an intention tremor, at least that’s what I was told this is called. I used to have really steady hands; for example, I used to do computer repairs that involved removing tiny screws, replacing bad capacitors with a soldering iron, and basically just handling a lot of small objects that had to be moved with intricate precision. Over the years since my MS diagnosis, my fine motor skills and dexterity have gotten worse, but I have learned to work around that for the most part. However, something else came up when it comes to working with my hands that I can’t seem to find a way to work around. Intention tremors. You see, my hands won’t really shake as much until I actually try to do something that causes me to really focus on keeping my hand steady. The most simple (but one of the most frustrating) examples I can give you is when I simply try to eat soup. I know the soup is hot, so I try to slowly raise the spoon to my lips so I can just sip at it, but because I am thinking about trying to keep my hand steady, it starts to shake and usually ends up causing me to spill my soup all over the table or burn my mouth. So I generally try to avoid soup because of this.

Frustrating beyond belief

Luckily, none of this stuff is painful, it’s just really annoying. I mean REALLY annoying. When it comes to the tremors and spasms I sometimes get before bed? Well, it’s already hard enough for me to fall asleep with all the insomnia issues I have, so this just makes it that much more difficult. As far as trying to physically function during the day? It’s beyond frustrating when I can’t do a simple task that I have been able to do all my life like using a screwdriver. It used to be so easy that I never even had to think about it, but now? I can barely even place a screw (if I can do it at all) because my hand just starts trembling, causing the screw to fly off the screwdriver and across the room and go missing until I, of course, step on it in the middle of the night while walking barefooted to the bathroom after already having struggled to fall asleep because of the tremors and spasms in my shoulder.

I guess I would say that it being “frustrating” is a huge understatement, can you agree? Does this happen to you too?

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The MultipleSclerosis.net team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

  • mark mos
    4 weeks ago

    Same symptoms. EXACTLY the same and I was working with latex TOO! creating molds. CBD oli helps a little. I can sleep sometimes, but tremors wakes me up anyway. Longer I sleep, stronger tremors I have and heart palpitations. Because of that i lost 70 pounds within 2 months, I needed to pee each time tremors woke me up. Up to to 1 gallon of water/pee each night. Write to me pls how you handle this now: markmos49(at)gmail.com

  • Matt Allen G author
    3 weeks ago

    Hi, wow, that really sucks, I feel your pain because unfortuneately, I have no solutions… I just get up and go throughout the night. Sometimes cannabis helps with the bladder issues but for me? It does nothing for any tremmors or spasms.

  • WeziF
    6 months ago

    I have the same problem, except with me it’s my legs not my shoulder. I’m glad I’m not the only one, but I’m sorry it happens to any of us.

  • Matt Allen G author
    5 months ago

    It’s “annoying” to say THE LEAST

  • DAKane
    6 months ago

    I sometimes get spasms in my right foot and sometimes my right leg, but only when I lie down. I tried a muscle relaxant – Baclofen – but it made me sick. I find that a glass of wine or two to four puffs of cannabis (indica) stops the spasms and helps me have a good sleep.

  • Matt Allen G author
    5 months ago

    Baclofen does NOTHING for me. I don’t drink anymore and while Cannabis helps with a lot of my MY stuff it doesn’t stop the spasms, weird…

  • itasara
    6 months ago

    Nighttime has not been a problem for me; mornings are often problematic just as I am waking. My an ankles and/or toes cramp. Most of the time if I change my position the cramp will tesolve. Funny that last week I had a cold and I haven’t had any cramps. I also haven’t drank any coffee since my cold started. It might have nothing to do with it but just don’t know for sure.

  • Matt Allen G author
    5 months ago

    Hmmm… I am an AVID coffee drinker, like 2 cups a day. There better not be a connection because I am not sure I can give up the joe

  • muse77
    7 months ago

    Oh, and my days as the makeup artist of all time are OVER. Eye liner is just a thing of the past. I lament the sad fact that I must now look my age, and no longer do professional stage makeup, much less just dress up so as not to frighten people!

  • Matt Allen G author
    7 months ago

    I know this isn’t the same but when I was in high school (and shortly after) I was planning on going to school to be a special effects makeup artist. I made latex prosthetics, sculpted, did all sorts of crazy Halloween stuff and now? Haha, forget it.

  • muse77
    7 months ago

    Tremors and spasms at night? YES. Also, if I’m in my recliner watching TV, the legs will occasionally kick in – no pun intended. I take muscle relaxers and gabapentin at night, which help for the most part. But then I can’t always wake up. And SOUP??? So I’m not the only one!!!

  • Matt Allen G author
    7 months ago

    It seems SOUP is an arch enemy of people with MS!

  • Froggie
    7 months ago

    I’m one of the lucky ones in that my MS doesn’t disturb me too much at night. I have, however, an intention tremor in my right hand that makes life really frustrating. I am right handed and have been forced to learn things with my left. This includes writing, which is really fun. Not! The worst is trying to do anything requiring fine motor skills. Imagine trying to grasp a computer mouse and have your hand shake so badly you need to hold it with your other one. I’ve had to adapt for activities such as cooking, which is a pain in my bum. I used to chop and mince with no problems, but now I’m lucky to be able to hold a knife without cutting myself. Thank goodness for the food processor!

  • Matt Allen G author
    7 months ago

    well I definitely don’t have it that bad, but what really sucks is that I used to be able to write with both hands decently. It was just a challenge to learn how to do that in high school, it wasn’t anything natural for me. But now, the left side of my body is kind of limp and unresponsive when it comes to certain motor skills. So while I’m not really sure if. I have the same intention tremor in my left hand it doesn’t really matter because I couldn’t use it if I wanted to. Very frustrating.

  • Nelda
    7 months ago

    I have somewhat similar problems with spasticity in my left leg. Mine starts when I sit down and want to relax like when I want to watch T.V. or am at a play or concert. It is a tightness in my calf. I have trouble holding still. It helps to stretch it out (a little bit) but when I go to bed it often is awful. You can watch my foot tighten up and my toes point to the ceiling. For a while I used a TENS unit: electrical stimulation that sometimes helped, but other times made it worse. I more recently have been using a Shiatsu massager. It is one designed for the neck, but I put my calf on top of it and I can get some relief. It got VERY BAD one night a couple of months ago, where my left leg went onto a full charley horse cramp every 5 to 20 seconds. It did this ALL NIGHT. I finally got up about 6 am. I discussed this with my neurologist who has prescribed Clonazapam which wipes me right out and I don’t care about my foot at all any more!! I am trying not to use it too often and attempt all of the non-pharmacological ways. I do already take the maximum dose of Baclofen and Tizanadine (Zanaflex) which both are C.N.S. relaxants.
    Have you discussed this with your neurologist? You need to bring that up at your next appointment. Mine got so bad that I made a special appointment just to discuss that because I needed some sleep! It certainly affects quality of life!

  • Matt Allen G author
    7 months ago

    Oh man, that sounds horrible! I had some pretty bad spasticity issues with my legs about six years ago but that has for the most part resolved itself. But I have been on baclofen and Zanaflex and they did nothing for me. The baclofen made me a little tired at first but. eventually it didn’t even do that. Klonopin works great for insomnia and helping me overcome the tremors so I can sleep.

  • esly
    7 months ago

    Definitely! Going to bed is always frustrating to me because I know my body will start to get more spastic and even though I’m super tired, my body won’t relax so I’m always reaching out to muscle relaxants so I can fall asleep…..
    I totally feel you!….
    Be good:)

  • MarkUpnorth
    7 months ago

    I noticed similarities to my M.S. with R.L.S., of which I tried controlling using prescribed drugs by my Neurologists, which worked for a while, then gradually stopped working. I then years later after just suffering with it, started using, recommended dose 2 tabs of magnesium citrate. (Over the counter supplement). One in the morning, and important: 1 at night about an hour before bed.
    Works like magic, better than any script! Worth a try?

  • Matt Allen G author
    7 months ago

    Funny, that’s exactly what I did when I was having issues with RLS. I was trying to get off using clonazepam every night so I started taking magnesium and it seemed to kind of help.

  • LeeAnn
    7 months ago

    I can relate to your problem. I occasionally, while in bed, will have a part of my body jerk but it’s never stopped me from going back to sleep. The tremors I get are during the day are extremely worse when I’m stressed or just plain tired or fatigued. I have noticed that it has been getting worse. I started with head tremors just before I was diagnosed in 2004. This past year and a half my Neurologist got me on medical marijuana and it really helps with the tremors but I can’t always afford to buy it. It would be nice if the insurance companies would recognize it as a medicine. It’s a whole lot safer than taking other drugs that are addictive. You don’t get addicted to this. MJ also helps you get to sleep and takes care of a lot of other ailments you may have. Check with you Neurologist and see if he/she would help you get on the program. All I know is it works! I hope you find something that will work for you.

  • Matt Allen G author
    7 months ago

    I actually do use medical marijuana. It helps amazingly for certain symptoms but unfortunately, it doesn’t seem to do anything for the random tremors at night. Everyone is different I guess,

  • Shelby Comito moderator
    7 months ago

    Thank you so much for sharing @leeann. I’m so glad to hear you’ve found something that works for you and helps relieve your symptoms. We appreciate you sharing with the community. Best, Shelby, MultipleSclerosis.net Team Member

  • christinepotter
    7 months ago

    I had my first “attack” of MS in 1992. Did not find out what it was until 2008. Daily symptoms are restless legs, the “tics”, ms hugs, and charlie horses in my legs that feel like they are ripping my muscles apart. And it all rises to a crescendo when I try to go to sleep. Nothing helped for the longest time, and then one of my doctors tried Klonopin. It replaced 3 other drugs and works like a charm! I still work so I can only use this at night, but I feel so fortunate to have it. I have an appointment in January with my neuro, and I plan on asking for a prescription for cannabis oil. I know other people who are using this with great success, and am lucky enough to live in a state where medical marijuana is legal.

  • Matt Allen G author
    7 months ago

    Klonopin is definitely a wonderful truck for certain symptoms but as a benzodiazepine it can be habit-forming. As far as medical marijuana, depending on your state, usually there are doctors who only write prescriptions for the stop and neurologists tend to stay away from writing the actual prescription even if they are the ones who recommended it

  • sevensix
    7 months ago

    MS spasticity is common condition that never bothered me until one afternoon at PT all heck broke loose out of the blue, my first experience with spasms and a lousy one at that. Therapist managed to get me parked in a chair pinning me against the wall as I violently thrashed about out of control. My wife was called to pick me up, I was barely able to transfer into the low slung Honda falling down. The spasms would not stop necessitating a visit to ER that night. There were more opportunities to get to know the ER staff as spasms continued to pummel me almost everyday.
    Eventually after much suffering a trial Baclofen procedure was successful and a Intrathecal Baclofen Pump was implanted soon after. It took four years of biweekly dose adjustment to arrive at the ideal window of effectiveness which is now 704 mcg per day straight infusion. It works admirably well with very few break through spasms. I was previously taking varied doses of benzo to halt the spasms but that is not the way to go with this condition.
    Spasms literally beat the crap out of me and anyone else (wife learned to keep her distance) who were close to me. I’m happy with the pump. Refills every 90 days. Insurance will not be happy with you. Too bad, now they are paying for cancer treatments, a lose-lose for all of us.

  • Matt Allen G author
    7 months ago

    there was one point about six years ago where my spasticity was so bad that I wondered if I would need to pursue the baclofen pump route. Luckily I didn’t have to but man, I couldn’t imagine dealing with what you deal with.

  • nilahkaye
    7 months ago

    My son was diagnosed with MS when he was 16
    He is now 22. Cannabis is the only thing that truly helps, but we live in Tennessee. He has now been charged
    With a misdemeanor of cannabis possession. It’s so unfair. He has horrible spasms and numbness in his extremities. I don’t understand why it hasn’t been legalized for medical treatment.

  • Lamm
    7 months ago

    I also live in Tennessee and the lawmakers and political leaders are closing their eyes to what marijuana helps and doesn’t help. I have numbness & pain always ! I can’t get my Doc to prescribe anything that works. Marijuana does help some symptoms but, illegal here anyway. I can relate to everything all of you have said, i have or have had all of the same crazy symptoms. Glad to hear some of you are getting relief ! See my Doc in December & keeping fingers crossed that i may get to use a med that helps.

  • Matt Allen G author
    7 months ago

    I am so sorry to hear, that is unbelievably unfair. Unfortunately I think the answer as to why things are like this has everything to do with politics so I’m not sure what the answer will be.

  • Shelby Comito moderator
    7 months ago

    I’m so sorry to hear what you and your son are going through @nilahkaye. I can’t even imagine how frustrating that must feel. Please know that we are here for you as you go through this and you are not alone. Thinking of you both, Shelby, MultipleSclerosis.net Team Member

  • debbiegrillo
    7 months ago

    Omg! This is me 100% I find my hand tremors wake me up in the morning! At night I struggle with insomnia so once I get to sleep (that’s much needed) my leg starts to spasm banging on my bed and it’s very scary.

  • SKTarran
    7 months ago

    Oh my God – this is sooo me!! And it happens almost every night!! I also am experiencing loss of my fine motor skills and feel like I am losing the ability to crochet like I used too. It makes me very sad.

  • OliviaJ
    7 months ago

    Oh yes, this is familiar. I’m right-handed but can barely sign my name without the pen flying all over the place and I now have to eat with my left hand, not just for soup. As for spasms, they interrupted my sleep night after night, usually more than once. I take a lot of gabapentin, which may have a different name where you are, but it’s the only thing that has really worked. I hope you get some relief!

  • Matt Allen G author
    7 months ago

    I tried gabapentin several times in the past at different doses. It never did anything for me and now, for whatever reason, it makes me terribly tired. It didn’t do that in the past that this last time I tried it I couldn’t even make it a week for had to stop because it was just too much, I felt so lethargic

  • MargieF50
    7 months ago

    Sometimes I think the worst of tremor is the terrible tick feeling all over as my meds wear off and the tremors reawaken! The frustration of writing my name or sometimes just making a simple gesture can be discouraging.

  • Ldonato23
    7 months ago

    I have a constant tremor in my left hand that increases with stress or if I use the hand too much. This was my first MS symptom that began approximately 10 years ago. It can get very painful. My neurologist is the head of the MS department at NYU and she sent me to see the chief neurologist of the movement and Parkinson’s hospital in NYC. He determined it is a dystonic tremor. I began taking Artane in May. This is typically a medication used to treat tremors from Parkinson’s disease. Although I saw great results initially, I am now back to shaking intensely all of the time. I have to decide if increasing the medication is worth it. My goal is to be able to strengthen this arm/hand before more function is lost. Not sure what to do though

  • chalknpens
    7 months ago

    Exactly~

  • chalknpens
    7 months ago

    But when I feel a tug on my shoulder, I prefer to believe it is my deceased husband’s hand just trying to reassure me that he is nearby…

  • mikepiz
    7 months ago

    Also I use a short stool (about 5 inches high) or walk up and down the stairs which seems to stop the spasms for some reason.

  • mikepiz
    7 months ago

    I get spasms almost every day day & night and and told my MS doctor and he gave me prescriptions for Baclofen and Gapentin which helps most days.

  • brendarose0070
    7 months ago

    I feel your pain. I have spaciciity In the form on restless legs at night or even in the afternoon if I dont take ropinorole at about two and again at bedtime. I also take baclofen at bedtime, magnesium during the day and a couple of other meds prescribed by my neur. I have trouble when I am getting a pedicare with my legs not jumping. If I skip my meds I end up like you finally getting out of bed and walking around until I can sleep. If you haven’t tried ropinorole, it might help you. Good luck!

  • wolfmom21fl
    7 months ago

    oh man. i can soooo relate to this. before i was ever diagnosed with MS, i saw a doc who told me i had RLS.. i questioned him about that diagnosis because it was not ONLY my legs but rather all of my limbs.. i would literally flail as i was trying to fall asleep. i had been knocking things off my night stands, breaking lamps, kicking pillows and covers off the bed… the only he could say to that was i had an “atypical” presentation… Ya think? LMAO. in any case, he did prescribe Requip which i must say has helped me tremendously! it really has all but eliminated the involuntary movements and feelings of insects crawling around inside my limbs and my night stands are now safe for the most part. the spasms are another story and dont seem to be related to this. i do take a muscle relaxer for those before bed and it helps but nothing i have taken seems to work all the time for the spasms. sometimes my leg, sometimes an upper back or neck thing, even an MS hug.. its very weird and random but always is worse when i am overly fatigued for whatever reason. i also get the ‘ticks” those little jumping muscle movements that dont really hurt but are very annoying. i get them alot in the muscles around my eyes but also in the hamstring muscle in my left leg and around my right should.. both of those had sustained major injury in the past and i wonder if there is a connection there.. in any case.. TY for writing.

  • Matt Allen G author
    7 months ago

    I get the weird “tick” things too but I never really knew what to call them. I’ll get them everywhere, ever on my face. As far as triggers? I haven’t noticed any pattern, it’s just totally random (it seems)

  • scharryolds
    7 months ago

    I too have the spasms and tremors. It is usually in my hands and arms, daily. Leg and feet cramps at night. However, when the temperature drops, my whole body spasms/tremors. When it’s warm outside, I get severe sweats. Can’t win either way. UGH!

  • Donald
    7 months ago

    I can sympathize with the trying to place a small screw or intricate part, that was one of the symptoms that started my understanding with what I was experiencing that ended up being diagnosed with ms, beyond frustatit.
    Doug

  • Matt Allen G author
    7 months ago

    yeah, especially when you have been able to do it for as long as you can remember, something SO SIMPLE

  • Guitar-Grrrl
    7 months ago

    I have painful spasms in every muscle group. Think: Charliehorse on anabolic steroids! Sometimes I even have whole body spasms that start in my ribs, then my back, abs, legs, arms, fingers and toes join in the fun (not)! I’ve been on the highest oral dose of Baclofen for the last three years. At night, I’ll eat 12-15 mg of cannabis chocolate or gummy bears, or if I’m traveling out of state or country, I’ll take 5 mg of Valium. Those help quite a bit at night, but these spasms happen during the day, too, and I just can’t live in that impaired state with daily responsibilities, grandkids, etc… So at the end of next week, I’ll be the proud owner of a ITB pump. Even though it seems like a drastic step, I’m not getting adequate symptom management otherwise.

    As for intention tremor, mine is worst when stressed or overheated. And, yes, soup is a bugger, unless it’s nice and thick. 🙂

  • nancytngirl
    7 months ago

    in response to Guitar-Grrrl: The HIGHER the dose of Baclofen I got, the WORSE it got!! I talked to other ms support group members and it seemed to be widespread that baclofen not only didn’t help us, it magnified it tremendously. I too, and many others, was on the highest dose there was, until I begged and got it changed. Valium saved my life. The 1st valium I got… It stopped dead. severe severe severe spasms for may years until I got relief.. please read the other replies and other drugs. you need to switch it up. I’ve had MS 30+ years, I’ve been thru it all. I damn near got the baclofen pump, I thank god I didn’t.

  • scharryolds
    7 months ago

    I too have the same all body tremors/spasms. Valium has been a savior! I take 2mg 3 x p/day, as needed; 10mg of baclofen 2x per day, and am taking Gabapentin 1600mg p/day. And tramedol to help with the break-through pain. Have trigeminal neuralgia pain on top of everything else. The current meds makes me a little more comfortable. Have blurred vision and light sensitivity now too. Total disability since January 2018. But I still find work arounds to deal with daily life. It’s a challenge but, challenges are good in a way. 🙂

  • Matt Allen G author
    7 months ago

    wow, yeah, mine is nowhere near that severe. For me the only thing that seems to calm it down is the Klonopin I sometimes take for insomnia.

  • Christa
    7 months ago

    I would’ve asked maybe it’s restless legs and not your MS until I read it was your shoulder. How frustrating! I know how difficult it can be to get sleep even on a good day!

  • Matt Allen G author
    7 months ago

    When I was first diagnosed with MS I had REALLY BAD RLS, I tried everything because I just could not sleep! Eventually, I was prescribed Klonopin which did the trick.

  • chong61
    7 months ago

    Never had this with my shoulder, it is daily with my legs and my right hand. I do have pain with mine, sometimes can’t even tolerate a sheet touching me. I take medication to help me sleep, but this leg jerk and drawing of the feet and jerking of my hand is a everyday happening.

    I feel for you and your shoulder, but am happy it is not painful.

  • Matt Allen G author
    7 months ago

    I occasionally get it in my leg but always just assumed it was a sleep start but I guess I have no way to tell. But as you said, thankfully it’s not painfull, it can always be worse.

  • Kristie
    7 months ago

    This happens to me as well but it is in my legs. My doctor has me on Amantadine (sp) to help but it does not really do anything. As you said, there is no pain just frustration.

  • Matt Allen G author
    7 months ago

    I would ask your doctor about trying something new… Speaking from personal experience, Amantadine never did anything for me regardless of what it was prescribed for but that’s just me.

  • collena
    7 months ago

    I tend to see my MS as a sneaky evil monster too. Stealing my abilities around every corner. Just when I think I’ve inventoried my losses I drop my glasses and lose a screw that I have no earthly hope of finding let alone replacing.

  • Matt Allen G author
    7 months ago

    I can’t tell you how many tiny screws I have lost to the interdimensional portal that is somewhere in my carpet. I assume it leads to the same place socks go to when they go missing in the dryer.

  • rolly
    7 months ago

    i can relate to eveyrthing you wrote. the spasms, although i get them in my legs, but usualy when about to fall asleep. and the intention tremors, which must be one of the most frustrating things associated with ms. i only hve use of my right hand, but intention tremors in that hand are part of my daily life. it seems that the more i concentrate on keeping the hand steady, the more it trembles. i couldnt agree more that the term ‘frustraging’ is a huge understatement.

  • Matt Allen G author
    7 months ago

    My mother is an Occupational Therapist and what she says sometimes works for people with intention tremors is to use weighted item. For example, they will use a fork that weighs more because the added weight helps suppress the tremors. I know it sounds weird but I have tried it and it definitely helps. Thing is I am not really sure where to buy this stuff and I have never really looked as the majority of the stuff that triggers these tremors are random little things that I would never know I should have the right tool for the job with me.

  • Alina Ahsan moderator
    7 months ago

    Hi rolly, frustration is really just the tip of the iceberg with MS. I’m so sorry you have to deal with the same spasms and intention tremors that Matt describes in his article. Have you found anything that helps to manage them a bit? I wanted to share another article here with you by Kim where she explains several different treatment options in case you were interested: https://multiplesclerosis.net/living-with-ms/spasticity-treatments/ I know you’ve likely tried most of them – I hope you can find some relief soon!
    -Alina, MultipleSclerosis.net Team Member

  • rolly
    7 months ago

    hi alina, and thanks for sharing that article. as you had already guessed, i’ve pretty much tried them all, except for cannabis-based products, which are – unfrotunately – not available where i live.
    i’m on the maximum dosage of baclofen for the spasticity, and it does help some of the time, but not when the spasticitiy is really bad. on those occasions i get massages from my partner, which helps somewhat.
    as for the intention tremors, there is nothing at all that helps, which is the most frustrating bit. but thanks for sharing that information.

  • Alina Ahsan moderator
    7 months ago

    Hi rolly, I’m sorry the article wasn’t much help 🙁 I had figured you had tried most of them, but it’s so frustrating that certain products aren’t available to you to try!!! I’m glad that you have found things that can somewhat help you manage the spasticity, but the intention tremors sound like the worst. I have seen around the community other people have had some success with physical therapy, but nothing can completely get rid of them which is just awful. I’m so sorry you have to cope with them!
    -Alina, MultipleSclerosis.net Team Member

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