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Treatment

Complementary and Alternative Therapies

  • By Laura Kolaczkowski

    I’m a big proponent of complimentary therapies to add to what my neurologist provides.  I still take my disease modifying drugs and the other things for symptom management, but I also have regular massage therapy and accupuncture.  These both give me an added boost of relief – both the  physical  effects and stress relief.      I’m always interested in what others are doing to add to their treatments.  Do you  care to share?  Laura

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    • By JJ123

      I think complementary therapy is helpful. I have tried acupuncture with cupping. The most significant benefit I saw was a decreased level of anxiety that I was experiencing based on being newly diagnosed with MS. I also feel that there are key supplements that are of benefit, however, still researching. Know of strong evidence that supports Vitamin D and Omega 3. Anything that reduces stress, such as meditation, massage, etc., is of great benefit.

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  • By Cathy Chester Moderator

    I, too, am into complementary therapies.  Aside from taking my disease-modifying medications, I look to gentle yoga for stretching for better balance – and it feels good.  I’d done T’ai Chi and I also love massages every once in awhile. They help get rid of the “knots” from stress, and feel so damn good! I take many vitamins (a good multi, lots of Vitamin D – please ask your doctor how much – cranberry, CoQ10, Calcium. Red Yeast for cholesterol and a baby aspirin).  Please note: these supplements are ones I researched for myself.  They are not intended to provide medical advice and I ask you talk with your doctor before taking supplements.

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  • By Faith French

    I chose Functional medicine in Feb, and now kick myself for not doing that when diagnosed 15 years ago with MS. I spend lots of time online daily and learned so much, most of which never mentioned by my neurologist. All he offered was MS and symptomatic drugs. A basic healthcare presents life changing benefits for me.

    I think there should be a focus and encouragement for patients with MS to address general wellness and how that can impact living with MS. Exercise, diet, and natural vitamins, minerals and/or supplements are basic health options all should consider daily.

    Some of my MS symptoms have improved in only 7 weeks. I think, write, and speak  clearer.  All my muscles are strengthening, which has improved my balance and walking. I often do better without my cane. I stand steady with my eyes closed in the shower. I lean but stand to put pants on. I walk faster, and I sort of ran to the phone once. The best is how I feel good about myself overall. Like the “me before MS” still exists.

    I have a long way to go yet. I have to make up for 15 years of loss I allowed. I just knew when I found my way to have more control of this unforgiving neurodegenerative disease. I have the best guides to assist me with my goals. Along with identifying areas to work on, I collected loads of heavy metals over the years. No Dr looked there before and more info every year shows these metals do impact many function in our body. Detoxing starts tomorrow.

    This new objective is likely the most difficult I’ve ever attempted. I strongly believe patients would benefit from these issues becoming a standard of care, and especially when diagnosed with MS. It is hard work, but it all can be adjusted to fit everyone and most health conditions. It won’t rule out drugs, but it can help decrease the needs for drugs, and it can naturally increase the quality of life.

    Even if healthy, you can still suffer if your quality of life is less than the best you can achieve. Common medicine is not the only option to have a healthy and full life. Do your own research and asks questions until you clearly understand. No one has all the answers, and rarely is there only one answer. No one cares more than you about your health. You have control over your health decisions. Be fully informed and comfortable with the health team you trust.

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  • By Cathy Chester Moderator

    Great answer, Faith (I think your name says it all!)  I hope at some point you will submit a post of all you just discussed.  I agree with you on every point, wholeheartedly.

     

    Cathy

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