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Too young for this

  • By Lovelady102613

    Hi – I was diagnosed last year at the age of 27. I’ve been diagnosed for 6 months now, and being diagnosed so young definintly has it’s issues. Me & my husband are trying to start a family, but you can’t/shouldn’t get pregnant when you are the MS meds, that’s the biggest issue we are having…. so I haven’t started any modifiying drugs yet. Also, I am suffering from some major cognitive issues..they come & go, but I’m scared that it will effect my career.

    BUT – I think being diagnosed young is better than receiving a diagnoses at an older age where you have the potential of already having more damage and farther along within a certain MS stage.

    It took me a while to deal with the fact that I had MS. I went through sad, angry, why me, I can handle this…then came my 2nd episode and I think that’s when it finally started to sink in… and now I’m on my third episode and I’m handling it much better.

    My advice – get your diet straight… and start doing yoga!! I do the dvds and they have helped with my strength, flexibility, and they calm my nerves (stress brings on episodes). Also – I have started having cognitive issues, so I’d suggest start doing mind games to exercise your brain… might sound weird, but for real – you’ll be thankful you did!!!

    I know I’ve ranted on here a lot, but being so close in age & both dealing with having MS so young it just kind of start spilling out. I hope this helps!!!

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  • By Becky

    Hi Ashley,
    I was diagnosed at the ripe old age of 21, after having a major exacerbation two days after my college graduation. I had been having weird numbness and probably other symptoms from about 15. I am now 37 and have been dealing with this pain-in-the-butt disease for over 15 years. I still have been able to complete graduate school, get married, start a family and grow and enjoy a pretty successful career. All this while dealing with RRMS and then SPMS for the last 5 years. Don’t give up before you have a chance to make yourself! I had a defining moment shortly after my diagnosis where I committed that MS would never stop me. I had to walk a ways from the parking lot of my university where I needed to turn in my full grad school application, and my bladder decided to tell me I was hot and I needed to go right now! I rushed to the nearest bathroom I could find and ran into the door. My heavy backpack thew me off balance, and I slammed into the doorframe and then to the floor. I ended up with whiplash and wet pants! After falling apart and sobbing for a while, I decided that I had to go on, so I went, wet pants and all, and turned in the paperwork, and then went to class. luckily I had on a long shirt and black pants!
    It was horrifying at the time, and I have learned over the years that those moments will always come when I have to make the conscious decision to get up. Let the tears come when you need to, but don’t let them stop you.

    best wishes to you 🙂
    Becky

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  • By phil m.

    I to was diagnosed at 25. It’s a crazy process to go thru this I know. But we will get thru it. I’ve was down about it but I know there is still stuff to look forward to. We have it and there is nothing we can do about it. Hang in there. 😉 this is new to me also. But Ms don’t have me remember that! Live for today

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  • By Katie

    Hi Ashley,
    I am 26 and was just diagnosed August 22, 2013 so a newbie to this fabulous disease as well. Being this young and diagnosed is difficult but it isn’t a death sentence. I have found comfort in leaning on family and friends who have been more than supportive and a distant relative also has it and has been walking me through things. The only bummer is I may never walk normal again due to not getting in right away as I had the attidue of “as long as I can adapt to it I don’t need to be seen”..which is kicking me in the butt now but it is a relief knowing why I am the way I am.

    For you others that posted, thank you. Your stories and the fact you all were diagnosed at young ages as well is nice to relate to!

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  • By Mindchser

    Hi Ashley,

    I was diagnosed at age 16 and have had this disease for 26 years now. It came on very quickly with starting out with severe vertigo while on vacation in Florida visiting grandparents to 3 weeks later waking up not being able to move my big toe to later that night in hospital not being able to move at all. Was very very scary and was told to expect life in a wheelchair, (needless to say the neuro had NO bedside manner), and well that just was not an option for me. So I went through my emotions rather quickly from sadness, pity and then just plain pee’d off at the world. I was on Solu Medrol 1000mg IV daily for 7 days and I walked out of that hospital. So you know, I am 42 years old now and I am a single mom of two beautiful girls, 16 and 19 years old. Was married for 11 years and struggled like any other person who dealt with divorce and being a single parent and made it through even with this disease. I also went back to school at age 34 for my degree in pysch and am in a job now that is very challenging and I love it. I have been very lucky in the sense that I have had a few exacerbations that I have worked through well enough throughout this disease without significant lasting issues.
    I am currently going through a flare up now and feeling slightly defeated and that’s why I came on here bc I remember the support I used to get from everyone online knowing that I am not alone. Then I saw your post and it reminded me of being newly diagnosed and it helped to renew my fight again. I know you didnt post much at all but I remember all the emotions you must be feeling right now and I just wanted to share with you all the possibilities there are still out there. It can be a daily stuggle, but trust me, it will get easier with time and healing and you will also get that fight when you get tired of believing MS has you and you start believing you co-exist with MS.

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  • By Mare

    Hi Ashley,

    I am sorry you were diagnosed so young. I received my “confirmed” diagnosis at 39, but I believe I had it far longer than that. Always had little weird things going on that went away after a day or so since I was around 18-19 years of age.

    Unfortunately MS can strike anywhere between 20-40 years of age. I am one of the lucky ones that has only had two (2) relapses in 15 years so my doctor classifies me as “MS stable” — if there is such a thing.

    Keep your chin up and your head held high. You will get through this. MS is just a bump in the road of life. After we accept it life does go on and I know that you will do fine!

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  • By Katie

    I was diagnosed when I was 21, they found it because I had optic neuritis in my right eye. I haven’t been the same since, to say I’ve been in a downward spiral would be an understatement. I think overall us, and people like us being diagnosed so young is more so a blessing then a curse because we have a better chance because we can feel body changes now and no when to get help, plus we start the medications sooner (although they make me sicker then the ms I think) good luck with everything!

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  • By Inkling Dancer

    I’m 17 now, diagnosed right after my 15th birthday, with symptoms about six months before that. At times it feels unbearably hard to not have others my age to talk to about this, but I’m learning that age isn’t as big of a factor as a willingness to share each other’s burdens. Still, us under-18s are much underrepresented among the MS community.

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    • By veronicar10

      I was diagnosed when I was 14 when I went to the eye doctor because I was unable to see out of my right eye. I’ve had MS for 4 years now and have had MANY significant flare-ups since. I’ve been on 4 different medications because none of them seem to be working for me. It’s definitely been a long, difficult battle dealing with high school, and now college, as well as balancing my health with my studies. It also sometimes makes it difficult to maintain friends since I’m not always feeling 100% and choose to not risk exacerbating my symptoms for a late night out… I’ve also never met anyone my age with MS, so that makes it hard to relate to anyone or have them understand exactly what it’s like to deal with our symptoms. Praying for a cure in the near future though!!

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  • By karablanchard

    Hi Ashley,

    My name is Kara, I’m 18 years old and I was just diagnosed a month ago. I have been completely taking the positive approach to it, have been eating healthier and working out hard!!! Stay strong, there are many others fighting with you!

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  • By Meagan Heidelberg Moderator

    Thank you guys for being a part of our community! We love our community commenting to each other! Kara, we have lots of information on newly diagnosed if you’re interested in reading; https://multiplesclerosis.net/living-with-ms/a-few-thoughts-for-the-newly-diagnosed/.
    https://multiplesclerosis.net/living-with-ms/advice-for-newly-diagnosed-from-someone-who-cares/.

    Best –
    Meagan, MultipleSclerosis.net Team Member

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  • By Anonymous

    Hi, I was diagnosed when I was 13 I’m 16 now. I could feel something in my head when I was a lot younger not sure if that was the lesions. It has been very hard . I keep to my self because, I don’t want to say something stupid. Sometimes I know what I want to say but can’t put it into words. Are I say the wrong thing. I was homeschooled for 5 years. I started back to public school last year. Even in elementary I couldn’t do the simples math problems, and still have a hard time. I don’t remember a lot of things from my pass. It does get lonely at times, its hard to talk to people about MS. They just don’t understand what you go thru , are why you can’t do things they do. on the outside they don’t see a person with a disability so they don’t understand some of the things I say wrong are do.I feel like people judge me. So I stay at home in my room to my self.

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  • By coles

    I am 21 years old and was just recently diagnosed. It’s difficult to live with something like this, but for me i think it gave me the push i needed. Ive never been more motivated to be healthy and stay happy and stress free. Best of luck!

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    • By Meagan Heidelberg Moderator

      @coles, thank you for sharing with us! We are so sorry to hear of your recent diagnosis but are so glad that you’re doing well staying healthy and stress free!
      Best – Meagan, MultipleSclerosis.net Team Member

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  • By Lizzy86

    Hi, I was diagnosed when I was 19 following a bout of Optic neuritis when I was 17 years of age, Was pretty rough going, as the only treatments really were only to do your own injections, which I’m sure many of you are very familiar with too.
    Getting to grips with this was hard, but the constant symptoms at that time really were one after another, as soon as one thing cleared up, another began. Pretty sole destroying at the time, when your really supposed to be choosing career and things!
    Thanks for sharing your diagnosis information, I thought I was young to be diagnosed with this, but as I see now, people are definitely being diagnosed younger than I imagine!

    But now I’m at a weird stage, couldn’t continue with my profession choice (hairdresser) but now I see that I might of researched it more, in hindsight. I have worked since, but nothing really worked out in the long run, but I’ll keep looking/ training best I can! It was fun at the time, but now I really do just feel like I exist, and that’s it!
    And It makes me pretty sad sometimes, but cant dwell on these things I guess!! I’m 31 now, so onwards and upwards, right??

    I’m not sure if this should have been posted on a different conversation stream, and I’m sorry it spiralled into something else, but I will always live by the’ Hope for the best, Prepare for the worst’ quote!
    Thanks for listening, take care x

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    • By Erin Rush Moderator

      Thanks for sharing, Lizzy86! And don’t hesitate to share your experiences on any of our forum threads! I wish we didn’t have so many members affected by MS, period. But, it’s especially unfortunate to realize how many people are quite young when they receive a diagnosis of MS.

      Also, many of our members have had to change career goals as their MS progresses. I do hope you find a job that fits your needs and interests!

      Thank you again for joining the conversation!

      Best, Erin, MultipleSclerosis.net Team Member.

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  • By rolly

    I had my probable diagnosis when I was 27, one year after getting married. I know it’s not easy to acknowledge to have a chronic illness at such a young age, when we are supposed to be active and have the entire life ahead of us. And of course, nobody else around you understands and just thinks you’re simulating. I was lucky enough to recover completely from my first two flare-ups and then not to have any major symptoms for several years, until it crept up on me again. I only got my definitive diagnosis at 37. Now I’m 49.

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  • By Plibby

    Hey just got to think i was diagnosed at 17 and its my senior year of high school and were all here for you, you dont have to go through it alone. It may be tough at sometimes but just remember their are people out there rooting for you.

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