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Invisible Illness: The Pain of Not Looking Sick

Invisible Illness: The Pain of Not Looking Sick

Living with an “Invisible Illness” can be mean living with a number of terrible symptomsSevere pain, trouble walking, speech difficulties, cognitive impairment, and emotional problems are just some from a large list of potential issues we must deal with. While any one of those would be enough to make life hard, even unbearable at times, I’m here to say that our biggest challenge is actually the fact that many of these symptoms are invisible.

Invisible illnesses

Multiple sclerosis, lupus, depression, Crohn’s, fibromyalgia, lyme, IBS, Alzheimer’s, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis. The list is too long to finish but all have symptoms that are primarily invisible at first glance. If you were to really look and know what you were looking for, sure, maybe you’d notice something. In my case, stumbling around and slurring my words, you might just think I’d had a few too many drinks (if I was having a good day, hey, maybe I did). A superficial glance and we all look good. “But you look so good” is a phrase that we have all heard so often and all of us cringe when we hear it. For many of us, it has the air of disbelief and that is where our invisible symptoms can bring about additional problems.

There is no worse feeling than to be in pain or having any of the other awful symptoms I’ve mentioned and then having to worrying about people not believing it’s real. Not believing. That’s the worst thing about it. It’s not about believing what a disease can do, it’s about people not believing us. It could be a stranger, a friend, a family member, or even a doctor that looks at you with disbelief. If you haven’t experienced it, it can be hard to understand just how awful that feeling is. Suffering when no one believes you makes the pain and hardship we endure double.

First impressions

I understand it, I do. First impressions drive the world and that first impression of us is that we are like everybody else. So when they see me chatting away with a group of people, maybe even holding a beer, and looking like everyone else and then hear that I’m on disability, they can’t grasp it. I “look good” but underneath my surface is an undertow of agony caused by my illness. People can’t see that and their mind can’t quite comprehend because of what their eyes tell them. Unfortunately, that’s the way our world is today. Our society is almost hardwired at this point to be judgmental based on appearance.

Please don’t misunderstand and think I wish I appeared more disabled. It’s very hard to look normal but we all give it our best, because at the end of each day, that’s all we really want, to be normal again. I do my best to look like nothing is wrong. I even try to not use my cane whenever possible, leaning against things or sitting when possible, because I want to appear like everyone else. Trying to “look good” is exceptionally taxing but also very important to me. But just because I’m putting up a good appearance, doesn’t mean I don’t want people to understand my issues. I want you to know why I leave functions early, why I cancel at the last minute, why I need air conditioning, and why I need days of rest. Many times, all of those things are even necessitated by putting up my “normal” appearance.

Handicapped parking

There is one example I have to talk about. Like many, I’ve encountered some discrimination when using a handicap placard. Even though I desperately need it, and every single step I take makes a huge difference in my life, I’ve had people see me and shout obscenities at me. I no longer even use it. Which means if we don’t find a close parking space, I’m apt to stay in the car. Most of the time though, I’ll end up just staying home. As a male on the younger side, I feel I’m put in a really bad position with regards to that situation so I avoid it. I have heard from many others with chronic illness that have experienced this exact same situation.

There are countless other examples where our illness not being on the surface can cause us trouble. Notably with friends and family not grasping our limitations or even just forgetting them. Having your family or friends upset at you for not attending an event or having to leave early can be a hard pill to swallow. It’s not our fault, but when our disability isn’t in the forefront, it’s easy to forget. The level of loneliness that hits when your own friends or family don’t understand can be excruciating. It’s no wonder that depression is so high in those battling an invisible illness.

Even doctors don’t always understand

Family, friends, and strangers aren’t the only issues. Many folks also have trouble with not only convincing doctors that they have issues but also explaining to them what their symptoms are. We are put in a place where many times we have to explain what we are physically feeling to medical staff; that’s not easy for everyone. It’s hard to get the appropriate attention you need when the doctor cannot physically inspect the issue. If I’m having a bad cognitive day, I might as well not even go to the doctor because there is no way I am going to be able to correctly explain what my issues are. I may appear fine on the outside though, so what’s a doctor to do when he can’t see anything and the patient can’t explain what’s happening?

We live in a world where appearances dominate so much of what we believe. How many of the society’s problems could be fixed if that wasn’t the case? I can’t answer that, but I can tell you that those who live with an invisible illness would live much happier lives. If you suffer from an invisible illness, you aren’t alone and I hope I’ve touched on some of the issues you may have encountered. Regardless of whether you have an illness or not, please remember that not everyone is as they appear on the outside. Remember that as you live your lives and let’s try to spread that awareness!

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The MultipleSclerosis.net team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

  • Rhonda.wiggins
    6 months ago

    At 53 years old, forgetting or not grabbing the words, seems easy to explain off with age. Sometimes symptoms could be explained off with “menopaus”. So FRUSTRATED. I know maybe its meant to be comforting, maybe encouraging…. but feels like i should stop whining.

  • Mike H
    2 years ago

    So many of us are right there with you Devin. I am one of them. Hey, don’t feel guilty about using your handicapped placard! Park in those spots my friend !! I know I do. I always look for them & put them to legitimate use. You ALSO have a disability. Who cares what people may think or say! YOU ARE ENTITLED!

  • LuAnnWaters
    2 years ago

    Couldn’t have said it any better. That saying has kind of bothered me too. MS has totally changed my life. Sometimes you just have to give in a little, but not give up. Thanks for writing this!

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    2 years ago

    Thank you LuAnn! So very true!

  • PVANN
    2 years ago

    Excellent article. My husbands family didn’t start to get it until they saw an interview with Montel Williams. I asked them what they thought was going on and my sister-in-law said “we just thought you were being lazy”.

    We moved recently and I have joined some groups to meet people. I usually tell them early on that I have MS, and not to flip out when they see me in my scooter. I also warn them that I lose words and get tired easily. When I do lose a word I just say “there went that one.” Most people will fill in what I need. If nothing else people are learning more about MS.

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    2 years ago

    Thank you PVANN! It really does seem that people we’ve known forever need to see or read someone else’s words to truly understand! Sometimes, it’s much easier to explain to someone you just meet. That’s been my experience too! Thanks so much for reading and sharing your experience!

  • Kera
    2 years ago

    Devin I absolutely love reading your stories. It’s like you are writing exactly what I am thinking. Sometimes I want to share your messages on my FB with a smartass comment to my “friends” saying “see I’m not lying. I’m not the only one” this especially rings true for this article.
    I have been discriminated against by so many people including my own family. Even my own mom started telling my family members that I was a hypochondriac and drug seeker. It wasn’t until I was approved for SSDI that my family members actually believed me. I had the same problem using my placard…I haven’t driven it over 2yrs. I was constantly given looks until my husband would pull out my walker. But on days I didn’t use it I would be embarrassed by the looks and side comments. Now I wear braces on my feet up to the middle of my calfs so I just flash those and the looks on their faces are priceless. If I take the bus and sit in the disabled spots and someone who ‘looks’ disabled gets on I have been asked to move either by them or other passengers. When I refuse people can get down right mean. One time I was at a large retail hardware store and needed a motorized cart. There was one left by the employee told me it was broken. I continued shopping, causing great leg pains and exhaustion. As we left we exited the same door we entered. An older woman was walking in and asked the SAME employee for the cart. He quickly grabbed it for her, she sat down and off she went. I just stood there. The guy looked suprised that I was there. I was furious. I asked “what the hell, I desperately needed that!” My husband was trying to calm me down but I just couldn’t contain myself. He told me “well…I thought it was broken. After you left I checked it and found it wasn’t” I said “BS when I asked you for it you sat in it turned it on moved it and quickly stated ‘oh yeah the battery dies quickly’. Because my them 3yr old son and 5yr old daughter were with us I didn’t want to loose my temper in front of them. I got his name and immediately called headquarters over it. All they did was apologize, say he’s an outstanding employee and they were shocked and that they would look into it.
    I purposefully avoid busy times of days to leave my house because of the way society treats me and others like us. It’s horrible

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    2 years ago

    Thank you Kera! So sorry that you too have gone through these issues. It’s becoming so common for many of us to experience problems because people can’t see our issues. As for your friends and family, absolutely sharing things like this on FB! Anything to help people realize and gain some awareness! Thanks for commenting, it’s always very appreciated! Sharing our stories, communicating, that makes a real difference!

  • cynt916
    3 years ago

    Very well done Devin!

    Thank you!

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    3 years ago

    Thank you!

  • AnnieFanniesFanciesForMS
    3 years ago

    I love your writing, you say so well what I am often unable to express, thanks to the lovely CogFog.

    Another problem I’ve found is that even others living with MS can have a hard time accepting what another living with MS can and can not do. Because of my years of “extreme involvement” with the NMSS, my in-person social circle (and closest in-person friends) is largely composed of people living with MS. They’ve all heard that MS is different for every person, yet many of them still say, “You could do it if you really wanted to”.

    Do people really think that, with my stubbornness and positive attitude, if I could WILL myself more able I would not do so? lol

    Thank you for all your insight and for sharing so eloquently!

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    3 years ago

    Thank you! You make an excellent point! I’ve seen this so often in the MS community. We tell others that everyone with MS is different but then don’t always act like it to each others. Thank you for bringing that up!

  • DavidA
    3 years ago

    I had to post an experience here that just happened last week. My brother in law doesn’t believe I have MS and to prove himself right he spent hours creating a fake Wikipedia Page entitled “Copaxone Use Disorder Vs Multiple Sclerosis Misdiagnosed”

    Despite the title being grammatically and medically incorrect, the whole article was 5 pages of completely fabricated data that he made up to convince me that I didn’t really have MS and had been misdiagnosed by my Neurologists due to my overuse of Copaxone.
    To have your own family not believe you is one thing but to create fake medical research takes disbelief to a whole new level.
    This has actually been one of the most painful parts of my MS experience so far. I haven’t confronted him yet. Any advise? What should I say to him?

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    3 years ago

    DavidA I am in complete shock that someone, anyone, let alone a family member would do such a thing. Have you done something to him? That behavior seems psychotic to me. You really have to have something wrong with you in order to do that. That, or he must have an incredible amount of hate for you. Because how can anyone so passionately not believe science and medicine. Copaxone isn’t even the kind of drug you get addicted to or overuse. This person just baffles me and really sounds not of sound mind. Brother in law, so I assume married to your sister, have you asked her what his deal is? She should be concerned about him too, because this aren’t the actions of a sane individual. I’d talked to her first. I’m very curious what will happen, so please let me know, even if it’s privately.

  • rabia yusuf
    3 years ago

    Absolutely dear.I can too relate my condition to it when I feel wordless to explain how I am feeling . It’s simply very practical problem as world demand evidence and here “seeing is believing ” rules so the MS brats are without exaggeration dumbfounded to explain the acute pains to doctors and loved ones as well . We pray some day a pain meter sort of instruments soon develop .

  • suze b
    3 years ago

    Thanks for this great article Devin, good for me to read today 🙂 Know i’m not a poet but penned this a few years ago after a particularly bad night

    Chronic Pain

    Well it goes like this, absoloutely nowhere to hide,
    can only make friends with it and have it sit by your side,
    It’ll demand your attention and exhaust you like a child,
    It’ll climb in beside you and torment your night,
    Then you’ve a choice, to abide or feel fright,
    But manage away, is what you decide,
    push on through, delighted you can,
    So when those around, because they can’t see inside,
    will wink, nudge and say,
    ‘Look at you, aren’t you grand’
    You’ll smile and say ‘Aye, aye I am’
    because how could you tell them in a way they’d understand.

    ‘The things you can’t believe are just things you haven’t known.’

  • rabia yusuf
    3 years ago

    A great piece indeed . And literary in highs and lows , MS never part us.It is such a great companion of ours.And yes absolutely we are special people that’s why we have MS,not tv every one can own it.When your heart doubt “Are you special “, feel free to say,” Aye,aye I am”. 🙂

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    3 years ago

    Thank you for sharing! It’s wonderful!!!

  • Dragon Lady
    3 years ago

    I was diagnosed six years ago by started having symptoms thirty-three years ago. I have relapsing remitting MS and had a relapse. I went to see a neurologist for help and he didn’t believe me when I told him I had MS. He wanted me to prove it to him. I immediately started looking for a new doctor and found an MS specialist. However, I have to travel 350 miles to see her! That first doctor made me feel absolutely horrible. Like I would lie about having MS. What a despicable person. I am now in good hands with a kind doctor who cares, understands, and is helpful. If a doctor doesn’t treat you right, find one that does.

  • Jerrychagolla
    3 years ago

    The best way to find out and is more accurate is having them taking liquid from your spine and testing that that will give more accurate results if you’re diagnosed with MS

  • DavidA
    3 years ago

    Amen to that. I’m so sorry your first doctor didn’t believe you. I’m happy you found a good professional who cares.
    Don’t you wish there was a way we could just transfer how we’re really feeling to our doctors for 5 minutes so they know we’re not faking it. If they could live in our bodies for a moment, I guarantee we’d get better treatment. That would be awesome

  • tfs
    3 years ago

    I am sorry you had to deal with a neurologist that did not only not get it, he made you prove your illness. I think despicable it fair. It is quite difficult to travel 350 miles though: I also travel to a major centre but it is only 1 hour away. You should be proud to be assertive with your health care needs.

  • DonnaFA moderator
    3 years ago

    Hi, Dragon Lady! It’s wonderful to hear that you found a true partner in healthcare, even if she is so far away. It makes a huge difference when you are truly heard. Thanks for sharing your story and for being part of the community! -All Best, Donna (MultipleSclerosis.net team)

  • awfk73
    3 years ago

    I’m 56 years old, was diagnosed with MS 12 years ago, and didn’t understand the invisible illness for years even though my son was diagnosed with MS at age 15 (he is now 35). While he is now on disability, has been for years, I continue to work in my field of addiction counseling. For the first three years after diagnosis, I followed my neurologist’s strict instruction on how to live with MS, to include giving myself shots daily. Because the side effects of the medication, I took other meds also. Because the “side effects” of having MS, I took even more meds. All under the direction of my doctor. By 2007, I gave up on life and decided to sell my house and, move back to my home state of Montana to, well… basically, die. I got off all the medication, thinking, if NOT taking the medication is going to increase my chance of dying sooner at least I will be able to die with a clear head. The opposite happened. I got healthier. I had more motivation to live. The difference in me is my level of acceptance. It’s not uncommon for me to lose my balance and appear intoxicated (I don’t drink.) It’s not uncommon for me to sound like I’m slurring. It’s not uncommon for me to sound like a space cadet. But it doesn’t happen all the time and I am very aware of when it is happening. My clients have seen me in those states, I make a simple joke about my MS getting the best of me at that moment. Then I do a quick assessment of my stress level since my wierdness seems to be connected to stress, may it be emotional, physical, or spiritual. I “ground” myself and slow down.

  • NoImNotDrunk
    3 years ago

    Yassss! I often get mistaken for a person who has one too many (ergo my user name and web site, noimnotdrunk.com). I am so happy to be in the position I’m in, to look good despite my condition, but it comes with its own set of difficulties. I can’t even tell you how many people have gone up to someone I’m with and whispered, “Is she okay?”

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    3 years ago

    I’m sure I’ve absolutely been confused for being drunk. Trouble walking, slurred speech, etc, it all fits. Hopefully in time, we’ll raise awareness enough that we will no longer have to worry about that misconception! Thanks for sharing!

  • Nancy W
    3 years ago

    I have several thoughts on this. Since my illness is invisible, who do I tell? Recently, I was having a fatigue related word finding problem. I tried to explain it to my friends that I was playing a game with, and I said, ” I will have to go home because my mouth is disconnected from my BRAWN. (Brain) We laughed but it was not funny to me. People do not understand cognitive issues.

    On the other hand, my Dad had polio as a child and walked on crutches until his 70s, when he started using a motorized wheelchair. Salesmen would treat him like he was stupid because he looked disabled.

    I guess my point is we all want compassion and understanding, no matter what we look like.

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    3 years ago

    Absolutely. Compassion and understanding should not be based solely on appearance. I hope that one day we’ll live in a world where that is a reality. There is hope though, I do think more and more people are becoming aware of those in our situation. Change does take time and effort though. Thanks so much for reading and sharing your thoughts, it’s appreciated!

  • tfs
    3 years ago

    Thanks Devin. It was really important to me to get some feedback. I am in good spirits right now.

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    3 years ago

    Happy to hear that!

  • tfs
    3 years ago

    Oh! What a very good article you have written today. Just a very few minutes ago, my partner told me to look after dealing with medical issues for our 27 year old male son. “Get him to the hospital, clinic today.” I am able to deal with this today; I am strong and well. It speaks to the fact that families do no understand that things have changed with the diagnosis of ms. Even though diagnosed additionally with a major depression, unable to work because of cognitive issues and fatigue – even though I am really working hard to get some emotional recovery – it doesn’t sink in. The true challenge is recognizing the unhealthy family pattern of “fixing” and giving the family members their own power. Yes. I have to recognize that my illness leaves me very much on my own. I can handle it. The family DOES NOT get it. “It is said that some people use MS as a crutch.” I can confidently say to myself that is not the case. Invisible symptoms are real and the MS Community gets it.

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    3 years ago

    Sorry to hear your family doesn’t always get it. You do sound in good spirits though! As members of the MS community, we all have each other. In some ways, we are the only ones that can truly understand it anyway. That said, I hope we can all continue to spread awareness on the subject! Thank you for commenting and sharing your story and keep up that strong attitude!

  • esme2288
    3 years ago

    I went to my PCP one time, with a bunch of relatively minor medical complaints, but what I really wanted was some help. I knew that she assumed I felt fine because I looked fine, so beforehand I wrote a list of all the ways invisible symptoms interfered with my life. I put it in my pocket along with a pencil and went to walk my dog before my appointment. While strolling through the woods I noticed amanita mushrooms had sprung up and the thought “amanita tea” came to my mind. It was a completely innocuous thought, but (because I’m a writer) I wanted to write it down. I took the paper with my symptoms/complaints on it and jotted “amanita tea” on the back of it.

    So, I get to the doctor, explain about the foot pain or whatever it was, then gave her the list I wrote. She read through it without comment, then turned it to the back, as if the list might continue there. Again, saying nothing to me, she rushed out of the room and returned with a social worker. Hallelujah! I thought. But no, they were there to commit me to a psych ward because I’d written, “Amanita Tea.”

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    3 years ago

    Oh my, I am so sorry to hear that. What an awful experience you had! There are way to many doctor’s out there that don’t get. More than any other, I feel that MS really is a disease that requires a person to shop around for doctors. I hope that situation had a happy ending!

  • Azjackie
    3 years ago

    I appreciate this article. I’ve never and will never understand why there is such an extreme significance to the corelation between outward appearance and social acceptance. I’ve seen this pre-MS to now struggling with this afflicition.

    Shame on the nasayers! They fail to realize everyone has something.

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    3 years ago

    It really is a shame. You’d like to think that people could get past outward appearances but sadly that isn’t the world we live in. Not yet anyway, I hope that spreading awareness about the invisible side of illnesses will help change that slowly but surely! Thank you for reading and commenting!

  • Blessed
    3 years ago

    Thank you for sharing this. Your description of living with an invisible disease is explained very well and I wish every caregiver, Doctor, family member… could read your article because I think it would help others to be more cognizant and empathetic. Although I have lived with MS for half of my life, some people in my circle still forget about my illness because “looks are deceiving” therefore, I gave up trying to justify or seek understanding from anyone when I am not feeling my best to participate in something. They just don’t get it and I am tired of trying to help them to understand. I thought the “Spoon Theory” would have helped them but it doesn’t.

    I have been on disability for seven years and I do not understand why anyone would think being unable to work correlates with laziness. I’m too young to be retired, I wish I could work. I’m waiting for the day someone makes a rude remark towards me about using handicap parking. I don’t get it, why would anyone want to pretend they are handicap.

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    3 years ago

    Thank you so much for the kind words! It really is amazing how “out of site, out of mind” people can be. Like you, I’m on disability now too and I’m sure there are folks that may think I’m lazy. But as you know, we all want to work, and badly. I even want to walk further in a parking lot, but I can’t. Thank’s so much for commenting!

  • giraffe516
    3 years ago

    Great article…I have walking issues so it is apparent there is something wrong but most people think it’s my knee. The worst experience i have had is using my handicapped placard and a woman came up t of me and demanded I move my car. That I was using my grandmother tag! That i shoukd be ashamed of my selk. She said she was calling the police. I told her go right ahead. I will be in this restaurant when they get here…unbelievable!

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    3 years ago

    It’s awful to here that we’ve all had some issue with a placard. Either due to other or even ourselves. I hope that we can continue to help spread awareness and share articles like this so that at some point, we won’t have to go through this. If not us, then those in the future who have MS. Thanks again everyone for reading and sharing your thoughts!

  • Azjackie
    3 years ago

    This is part of the reason I haven’t got a placard or mobility cart. My walking is noticibly affected however I grew up, worked with, and professionally advised the people within my small community.

    I haven’t shared my illness with them. They think I walk differently due to a broken leg & ankle from a car accident hit by a drunk driver.

    I am afraid of their attention, sympathy, or potential anger, since sitting or standing “I look well”. That may sound like non-sense or pridefully as my boyfriend calls it. Maybe it is, I will do something closer when I’m 50. Closer to “social acceptance and public appearance”.

  • Blessed
    3 years ago

    Just awful. I wonder why parking closer to the entrance is so important to some people. Oh how I wish I were “healthy” enough to walk normally without worrying about tripping and falling, walk without becoming so tired I have to sit down, walk without spasticity in my leg…

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    3 years ago

    Ugh, I hear so many stories about placards. People really need to mind their own business. I hope that articles like mine will circulate and help raise awareness that not everyone is as they appear on the outside. Thanks so much for reading and sharing your story!

  • meissie47
    3 years ago

    Oh my goodness! I so needed this article!!!. The issues I have are most definitely invisible and I’m filing for my disability benefits. Of course I don’t look “Disabled ” but I have issues that keep me from working full-time.

    Not only that I’ve been dealing with MS dizziness for the past 3yrs but I still drive (carefully ) along with cog issues that vary from day to day. I’m in the middle of my SSDI claim where I’m waiting to see a judge and I’m scared because I don’t look sick.

    My neurologist said they will look at you and think you think you don’t have problems because you look so good. But you do have problems. He said it may take you a while to get it but you will get it.

    Thank you so much for this article. (Im saving it)It is a lonely place. Especially when you feel no one believes you or gets it. So you end up faking it and suffering in silence.
    Meissie

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    3 years ago

    I know that dizziness and cog problems all too well! Happy that you can still drive, I no longer can. Good luck with your SSDI claim. It can be very nerve wracking, especially when we look fine on the outside. Should you have any problems, Mariah, one of our other writers has a number of great articles on the process: https://multiplesclerosis.net/author/mariah/

    Good luck and thanks for reading and sharing your story!

  • dtwhite1
    3 years ago

    Your article came at the perfect time. The last two weeks I have been in a lot of pain from my m.s. which is unusual for me. No one wants to hear about symptoms and besides our disease is invisible. So after being asked for the umpteen time why I am so cranky I finally said I have been in pain for two weeks. I should have given my son the benefit of the doubt cuz he believed me right away. Other people forget because they don’t see behind the scenes of what it takes to attend get togethers such as not doing anything the days before and the days after. Most of my friends just need to be reminded every once in a while.

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    3 years ago

    I’m glad your son believed you right away. Sometimes our friends and family need a gentle reminder that just because we look good, we still might be having problems. Thanks so much for reading and commenting!

  • jackie5275
    3 years ago

    My MS isn’t real bad, so I can still function pretty much fully as someone without it. The part of my body that is the most affected are my hands. I can’t hold heavy things very long, & it seems most things to me are heavy. Occasionally, I’ll drop something. Because of this, my family hardly ever remembers I have MS and sometimes seem to not care at all if I do or not. The most glaring reminder for them is when I take my Rebif injection every other day.

  • DonnaFA moderator
    3 years ago

    Hi Jackie! You’re not alone in being frustrated at the invisible nature of MS. It can feel very lonely when people, especially loved ones, don’t seem to acknowledge the challenges you’re facing. It’s important to communicate the things you’re experiencing, and to ask for and allow them to be your support system. We have a couple of excellent articles on breaking that barrier, that you may find helpful: Asking for, and Accepting Help and I’m of No Use – Save Yourself!.

    Thanks for being part of the community! We’re glad that you’re here and we’re always here for information, support or just to listen. -All Best, Donna (MultipleSclerosis.net team)

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    3 years ago

    I’m very happy to hear that things haven’t been too bad for you and I hope it stays that way. Dropping things can be a near constant problem for a lot of us. Thanks for reading and sharing!

  • AllisonJo
    3 years ago

    From your article “every single step makes a huge difference in my life…”
    Exactly.

    So well written. Thank you for explaining it better than I ever could. How do we explain a myriad of sytmptoms that change every day? Yes, even our doctor’s, as hard as they try, don’t always get it.

    Allison

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    3 years ago

    Thank you so much for reading and commenting! Hopefully small articles like this will get shared and we can all help raise awareness. Then maybe one day we won’t have to explain as much!

  • Pat
    3 years ago

    Awesome article. Captures the daily struggles of those of us who have MS! Will definitely share!

  • Devin Garlit moderator author
    3 years ago

    Thanks so much! Thank your reading and sharing too!

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