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Ampyra issue

  • By Tsukihime1long

    I was diagnosed with Progressive MS last July. Well, I was prescribed Ampyra (which, I was told) is not “technically” a MS medication even though it helps keep me walking. I called Acorda and was told they did away with the PAP because they are going generic at the end of the year. The medication is $2,500 a month and when I called the company, they told me that a generic price will all depend on my insurance company, the mail order pharmacy they use and the manufacturer the pharmacy uses. I do plan on asking my insurance agent because I have to re-negotiate insurance for next year. I was just wondering if anyone else has run into this issue with Ampyra. I apologize, this is my first post and I don’t even know if this is the right forum and if this is appropriate but I am just looking for advice/guidance.

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  • By Erin Rush Moderator

    Hi Tsukihime1long! You are in the right place! Thank you for posting. Since many MS medications are quite expensive, I know many of our members have had to negotiate with insurance companies or use aid programs to help with the costs for these treatments. I hope your agent is able to negotiate better terms for you and that you get a definitive answer from the company very soon. Have you looked into co-pay or assistance programs? I know if you have insurance, that you may not qualify for some programs, but I wanted to share this information with you, just in case. Here is the specific co-pay program for Ampyra — https://ampyra.com/cost-patient-assistance. And here are two reputable programs for assistance — https://www.pparx.org/ and https://www.needymeds.org/. I hope this information helps and that you also get some feedback from our community members as well. Good luck! Best, Erin, MultipleSclerosis.net Team Member.

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  • By Paddy

    HI tsukihime1long

    I was diagnosed with progressive MS since 2009, was on Avonex for nearly 8 years and then recently switched on to Teriflunomide Terigen 14mg a generic form of Aubagio.

    Also to manage my gait and imbalance currently i am on a generic form of Ampyra available as Dalstep Dalfampridine 10mg

    Agree that these patented medications are very costly and the only way is get the generic medicine., I did a lot of research to get my hand on these medicines.

    Reason: Most of the neurologist will never put patients on generic medicines, because its a huge market driven by pharma companies.

    I have collated few information on generic medicine in my blog
    http://dalstep.blogspot.com

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    • By Erin Rush Moderator

      Thanks so much for sharing your knowledge on these treatments, Paddy! Best, Erin, MultipleSclerosis.net Team Member.

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  • By vvxjr9

    Paddy – Wow, I have never heard that neurologist will not put us on generic medicines. Our medications are so expensive and it’s hard dealing with the insurance companies. I hope this is another case of the drug manufacturers and greed.

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  • By Donna Steigleder Moderator

    Speaking for myself and not as a moderator:
    While generic drugs are less costly than brand names, there is greater risk in using generic drugs due to the lack of controls in the manufacture of them. Often the same quantities or additives are not used in the production of generics as in the manufacture of brand names thus affecting the effectiveness of the drug. The buyer has no way of knowing that effect. However, it is not controlled, and the differences do not have to be announced in detail in marketing literature. There are actual differences in the drugs. Sometimes it’s minor; sometimes more significant. The cost is greater for the company who develops it due to the cost of liability for possible harm to those who are in trials. All their medical expenses are paid, and sometimes these drugs result in severe illnesses and death before they produce one that is safe. A drug company may end up paying a lifetime claim on a participant in a trial. That’s why the drug costs so much money.

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