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A woman trying really hard to push a tire that is bigger than her.

Tire Pull: The Weight We Carry

Have you ever watched people on television or social media workout with a large tire? They often use a large tractor tire to do different moves like flipping or pulling the tire across a distance of some kind. They will even pull it on concrete or uphill to create an extra challenge. As much as I enjoy working out, I can say that I have never even attempted the tire workouts! They look more like torture than fun to me but to each their own. It made me think though; each day many of us push, pull, and drag a tire of our own, and it’s exhausting.

MS is a heavy tire we drag behind us

Multiple sclerosis, diabetes, fibromyalgia to name a few. Stress, depression, negativity, fear, pain. We often don’t feel the weight of everything we are carrying until it’s right in front of us. We push and pull these tires just trying to get to the end of the road where we can finally release them. It’s so easy to get stuck right where we are. Sometimes, the tire is too heavy and you can’t possibly move it out of the way. For many of us here, that tire is MS. I’ve been stuck behind the tire lately myself. I can’t pretend it isn’t there. It isn’t about how heavy the tire is though. It’s all about how we carry it. Do we choose to carry our MS like a burden or to carry it with bravery and strength?

Facing the challenges head-on

I know I’ve carried mine both ways because there’s no denying that many days, it is nothing but a burden. When we choose to carry it like a burden, it is more like dragging it behind us. We keep going, but that weight is always behind us dragging us down. But, when I make that extra effort to carry it or flip it in front of me with bravery and strength, the tire doesn’t seem nearly as heavy because when I do it this way, I can face it head-on and eventually release it.

There will be good days

One of the hardest life lessons I’ve had to learn with MS is that we can drag and push our problems for ages, but if we don’t finally release these “tires” in our lives, they will eventually crush us. One can only tire pull for so long until they pass out from overexertion. Listen, I know it’s hard to fully release something when you feel the weight of it daily. When you’re in the midst of pain (physically, mentally, emotionally), trying to remember it’s only temporary doesn’t mean it will be quick. Temporary can mean days, months, or even years. Even if it’s long though, that pain doesn’t have to be permanent. That tire doesn’t have to keep weighing you down. You can release it and remember that there will be good days again. They may not be the good days that you’re used to.

Acknowledging and releasing the stress

We all know that MS changes things. My good days are not the same as they once were, but I have my good days nonetheless. If we put our minds to it we can create good even on the worst of days. I imagine, as with any other workout, that when one does a tire pull, the releasing of the tire at the end is the best part. It’s the part where you experience the satisfaction of knowing what you’ve just accomplished and your body feels that surge of happy hormones or endorphins. Identify the heavy stuff that’s weighing you down. Acknowledge it, press into it, and let it go. Release it. The tire gets heavy for all of us, let’s help each other carry the load.

XOXO,

Calie

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The MultipleSclerosis.net team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

  • Lily
    3 weeks ago

    Thanks for posting. We do carry a heavy load.
    I don’t feel so much as a push or a pull, for me it’s more like wearing the heavy tire.
    I always say “there’s too much gravity!”
    It’s as if I’m wearing a suit, and the sleeves weigh 10 pounds each, and the pant legs weigh 20 pounds each.
    So, with each movement, extra energy is needed.
    If I lie down, I get relief, but what people don’t understand is, the suit never comes off.
    They think that I’ve rested, and now I’m back to normal, their idea of normal.
    I let them think that, because as we all know, you don’t get MS until you get MS. :-p

  • Janus Galante moderator
    6 days ago

    Thank you for this Lily,
    you’re right. You just can’t explain this to anyone. Laying down has a whole different meaning when you’re wearing the suit.

  • Calie Wyatt moderator author
    2 months ago

    @johan thank you for your kind words, that means a lot!

    Best wishes, Calie

  • johan
    2 months ago

    Thanks Calie for being there for us and being so supportive. You are a very positive part of this community.

  • Calie Wyatt moderator author
    2 months ago

    @johan I certainly understand! Thanks for sharing!

    Best wishes, Calie

  • Johan
    2 months ago

    I do not carry my MS Calie, it has attached to me like an unwanted tattoo.

    JE

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