Skip to Accessibility Tools Skip to Content Skip to Footer
Life Beyond My System Glitch

Life Beyond My System Glitch

I remember writing an article before going to bed late Friday night and then waking up to being rolled under very bright lights, which I very soon came to know to be a room within the local hospital’s ER. I could see my daughter walking near me, and I read in her eyes emotions I didn’t know to feel yet – worry, fear and concern. At the initial start of awareness, I was simply in a state of immense confusion. I recall asking my daughter why we were there and what had happened. The response I received, “You had a seizure, Mommy!”, astounded me. Upon learning of this random, serious ‘glitch’ to my system, I very quickly assumed those same emotions I’d seen in her eyes…worry, fear and concern.

Not an everyday glitch

You’d think that after experiencing 11 years of myriad ‘glitches’ to my system that present themselves in the form of strange, unpredictable  symptoms derived from MS, I wouldn’t raise a brow at anything that might occur with my health… especially anything related to my brain or spine. But a seizure? This was just beyond margin. This isn’t an everyday glitch that occurs, so I have questions: Why didn’t I remember any of the ‘events’? What prompted me to have a seizure? Is it a symptom of or related to MS? Will it happen again? And, what now?

Tired with a capital ‘T’

After a brief hospital stay and tests, such as blood work, an MRI and EEG, I’ve yet to have all of my questions professionally answered, although I read that my memory was affected because unconsciousness can be a symptom of a seizure. I also read that it’s estimated that less than 3 percent of people without MS have seizures, but about 2 to 5 percent of people with MS are thought to have active seizures, although there are probably other factors that play a role in seizures, too. The ‘what now?’ I can answer based on my personal recovery thus far. This glitch has left me tired with a capital T, an uncomfortable sleepiness. It’s also (seemingly) worsened some of my MS symptoms. Prior to the seizure, both of my hands were weak and void of dexterity and my legs were weak, heavy and extremely stiff, difficult to move. They’re all worse. For now.

Following up with my regular specialist

(I say…) “No matter your circumstance or where you are mentally or physically, always strive to be and do better.”  

I plan to attend my pending follow up neurology appointment with my regular specialist. I’m seeking answers from one familiar with my medical history, as well as my current medical mishap, and I’d like for him to render his professional advice and counsel. Additionally, the hospital’s general physician and neurologist felt that physical therapy would be beneficial in helping me to strengthen the parts of my body further weakened to improve my function – even to where it was pre-seizure would be a plus. Because the sessions will be in my home, I will avoid the strenuous effort of preparing for and getting to an outside appointment. This is quite a personal advantage especially at this time.

My right now is only temporary. I refuse to let the effects of this ‘glitch’ be my ‘life beyond’ without a fight.

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The MultipleSclerosis.net team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

  • Dianne Scott moderator author
    1 year ago

    Hi @candy ..
    I’m sorry to hear of your seizure experiences.. They are indeed scary, I wholeheartedly agree. I wish you the best.
    Thanks for reading and your comment.
    Warmly,
    Dianne ♡

  • Candy
    1 year ago

    I’ve had seizures for the last 15 yrs and have yet to know a cause or know when they’ll happen. I never have recollection of what happened and I’m frightened by my own Service Dog. Every time it happens it’s as traumatic as the first. Stay safe and strong.

  • sevensix
    1 year ago

    Waking up surrounded by strange people under bright lights terrifies me. Thank goodness your daughter was cognizant of your condition being able to comfort you. Seizures are not fun.

  • Dianne Scott moderator author
    1 year ago

    Hello @sevensix
    Yesss..thank God for my daughter! She was terrified though and when I finally came to, I was too. No, seizures are definitely not fun – nor their aftermath.
    Thanks for reading my article and leaving a comment.
    Best wishes,
    Dianne ♡

  • sevensix
    1 year ago

    Diane-
    Vagus nerve response far out numbers the seizures that seem to leap frog each other. To make light of the unwanted conditions there are opportunities for moments of humor. After one of my spine surgeries it was time to yank out the staples. Out came one, out came the second, and I don’t remember the others being removed. I later woke up on the floor cradled in my wifes arms tenderly talking to me.
    Another post-op hospital scenario I was on a mission to the bathroom when a seizure started. My wife pinned me against the wall at the same time hollering for help as I melted to the floor. When I woke up I was back in bed with no recollection how I got there.
    I’ll save the hospital bed alarm incident for another time. I thought it was hilarious but the nursing staff begged to differ.
    Thanks for responding.

  • Poll