How significant is lesion size because I am a little freaking out?

So had the MRI’s done yesterday Brain Cervical Thoracic with and without contrast. I have lesions in all those lovely places. The brain didn’t show any change, Thoracic no new lesions but one with gliosis. However the Cervical spine last time the largest was 7 x 9 mm at C2-C3, this time it is 1 cm at C5-C6 the others have increased in size also but none pull contrast. I have a neuro apt on the 1st already but I feel like 1cm is pretty darn large and it just says “the largest lesion is located posterior to the C5-6 disc space and extends for a distance of 1cm” I don’t know if that means vertically or horizontally.


Community Answers
  • Erin Rush moderator
    7 months ago

    Hi Polifax! If you have any questions about your MRI, it’s best to discuss them with your physician. I believe that many of our members don’t stress as much about the lesions as they do about symptoms. If your symptoms are well managed, then many people don’t seem to focus much on lesion size. MRI results can be a good measure of progression, but they are only one of many diagnostic tools that are used to track MS progression. I hope your physician is able to offer you some insight on your results. Thanks for reaching out! Best, Erin, MultipleSclerosis.net Team Member.

  • J-darie
    7 months ago

    OMGI Stop in the Name of Love!! First off, the lesions on an MRI have never been found to be correlated to how the real person is doing( the clinical picture). 1mm=10cm, not that big of a difference, anyway! MS does degenerate over time, but eventually, for most, the body stops destroying mylin and the aging lesions can start to “ fall apart.” Secondary Progressive MS at this point is usually the diagnosis. I have had MS for 43 years, I have lesions just like you do and still walk, lead a fairly full life( MS-wise ) but have other health issues, too. Your job is to leave the MRI concerns to your doctor, after you get your questions answered. There is a lot to say for the days when patients did not even see certain results of tests. Concentrate on your symptoms management and remembering that MS is fluid, meaning it ebbs and flows. Even the progressive form can be managed in such a way that quality of life can be maintained. I am not one to talk always, as I am a retired RN, but worry less about your MRI(same MRI can be read differently by two different people) and taking care of what you can control, best ( not perfect ) symptom manage ) and stopping to smell the roses! Best of Luck!

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